Listed Building

The only legal part of the listing under the Planning (Listing Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 is the address/name of site. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing – see 'About Listed Buildings' below for more information. The further details below the 'Address/Name of Site' are provided for information purposes only.

Address/Name of Site

Edward VIII Post Box in the east gable wall of Forgandenny Post Office, excluding the Forgandenny Post Office, Post Office House and Forgandenny Garage, Main Road, ForgandennyLB52507

Status: Designated

Documents

Where documents include maps, the use of this data is subject to terms and conditions (https://portal.historicenvironment.scot/termsandconditions).

Summary

Category
B
Date Added
19/06/2019
Local Authority
Perth And Kinross
Parish
Forgandenny
NGR
NO 08728 18074
Coordinates
308728, 718074

Description

A 1936 wall mounted Ludlow-style cast iron post box, probably made by James Ludlow and Son of Birmingham. It is encased within a white painted timber frame built into a former window opening in the east gable elevation of Forgandenny Post Office.

The red painted rectangular box is 29 inches high and has a letter box slot with the 'E R' cipher and a crown in its upper third. The lower two thirds consist of a right hinged access door with a lock and an integral white enamelled sign below. The enamel sign also has the 'E R' cipher and a crown and reads 'POST OFFICE LETTER BOX, Notice: Letters containing coin, paper money or jewellery should not be posted in this box, but should be registered.' There is a separate small frame with collection times to the upper right.

In accordance with Section 1 (4A) of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 the following are excluded from the listing: the Forgandenny Post Office, Post Office House and Forgandenny Garage.

Historical development

Edward VIII came to the throne on 20th January 1936. He reigned for less than a year before his abdication on 10th December 1936.

The Ludlow-style of wall post boxes are so called because they were made by James Ludlow and Son of Birmingham (1885-1965). They were more economical than the large pillar boxes and were primarily installed at sub post offices. Many have been lost through the closure of the sub post office buildings which they served.

The Ludlow-style boxes did not carry the royal cyphers for Edward VII or Edward VIII, however, the two types are discernible from each other by different design details. The Edward VII boxes are 27 inches tall and the Edward VIII boxes are 2 inches taller at 29 inches. The Edward VIII boxes also had the double line warning notice added to the enamelled sign which reads 'Notice: Letters containing coin, paper money or jewellery should not be posted in this box, but should be registered.'

Statement of Special Interest

Forgandenny Post Box is an extremely rare example of a Ludlow-style wall post box made in 1936 during the reign of Edward VIII. It is believed to be one of only seven in continued use in the United Kingdom and the only known example in Scotland. It remains in both the position and form in which it was installed in 1936 and in particular, the survival of the lettering is extremely rare. The continued social historical interest in the abdication of Edward VIII who famously abdicated the throne for love over duty is also of special interest.

In accordance with Section 1 (4A) of the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 the following are excluded from the listing: the Forgandenny Post Office, Post Office House and Forgandenny Garage.

Design

Forgandenny Post Box is a standard Ludlow-style wall box. Ludlow-style post boxes are not rare, however, the Forgandenny post box has significant interest because it is one of a very small number made during the short reign of Edward VIII. It has design details that are exclusive to the reign of Edward VIII such as the unusual enamel notice and its size.

Setting

The post box is clearly visible in the east gable of the post office when approached from the east. It remains in both the position and form in which it was installed in 1936. Wall mounted post boxes are prominently positioned in the walls of a post office or boundary walls. The setting of this box is not unusual.

The buildings together with the post box form a historic grouping within the conservation area.

Age and rarity

Edward VIII came to the throne of the United Kingdom on 20th January 1936. He reigned for less than a year before his abdication on 10th December 1936. The number of post boxes created during his reign was therefore correspondingly small to other monarchs and only a small number of post boxes installed during this period survive.

The majority of Edward VIII boxes were freestanding pillar boxes rather than wall boxes. Current information from the Letter Box Study Group (2019) suggests around 271 boxes were made in 1936, 171 of which were pillar boxes. It is thought that 171 boxes survive in the United Kingdom around 30 of which are in Scotland. There are around ten listed Edward VIII boxes in Scotland all of which are the pillar box type.

Forgandenny Post Box dates to 1936 and has significant interest because it was made and installed within the short reign of Edward VIII. Edward VIII wall post boxes are extremely rare with only seven known to remain in use in the United Kingdom. The other six examples are all in the south of England in Bawdsey in Suffolk, South Petherton and Martock in Somerset, Frant in Kent, Woburn in Buckinghamshire and Wortham in Norfolk. There are known to be another three decommissioned examples in private ownership.

Forgandenny is the only known example of a rare 1936 Edward VIII wall box of this type in Scotland and has unique interest for its age and rarity.

Social historical interest

The Post Box has some social historical interest as it represents the development of the postal communications of Forgandenny Village in the later 19th century. The continued social interest in commemorating Edward VIII as the king who abdicated the throne for love over duty in 1936 has added to the special interest of this type of post box.

Association with people or events of national importance

The Post Box has a close historical association with a person of national importance. The post box was installed within the short reign of King Edward VIII and is an extremely rare example of a wall post box from this period.

References

Bibliography

Canmore: http://canmore.org.uk/ CANMORE ID 1620483 and 1620484.

Maps

Ordnance Survey (surveyed 1859, published 1861). Perthshire, Sheet CIX (includes: Aberdalgie; Dunning; Findo Gask; Forgandenny; Forteviot) 6 inches to the mile. 1st Edition. Southampton: Ordnance Survey.

Ordnance Survey (surveyed 1899, published 1901). Perth and Clackmannan Sheet CIX.NE (includes: Aberdalgie; Forgandenny; Forteviot) 6 inches to the mile. 2nd Edition. Southampton: Ordnance Survey.

Printed Sources

Gifford. J. (2007) The Buildings of Scotland: Perth and Kinross London: Yale University Press. p. 712.

Ross. G. (2007) Forgandenny: A Place in History: Triuirdarach Publishing, Forgandenny. p.315, 358, 423 and 440.

Mackay, J. A. (2009) 'Postal Services' in Veitch. K (ed) Scottish Life and Society: Transport and Communications. Edinburgh: John Donald (Birlinn Ltd) p.658.

Online Sources

David Chandler: On the Trail of Edward VIII (part 2) Forgandenny at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iplfkCmRn4A [accessed 21/03/2019]

Letter Box Study Group. Edward VIII Letter Boxes at http://lbsg.org/about-boxes/ciphers/king-edward-viii/ [accessed 16/04/2019].

Colne Valley Postal History Museum. Edward VIII Ludlow Boxes at http://www.cvphm.org.uk/LudlowTour.html [accessed 21/03/2019].

Other Information

Historical information courtesy of current owner (2019).

About Listed Buildings

Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating sites and places at the national level. These designations are Scheduled monuments, Listed buildings, Inventory of gardens and designed landscapes and Inventory of historic battlefields.

We make recommendations to the Scottish Government about historic marine protected areas, and the Scottish Ministers decide whether to designate.

Listing is the process that identifies, designates and provides statutory protection for buildings of special architectural or historic interest as set out in the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings which are found to be of special architectural or historic interest using the selection guidance published in Designation Policy and Selection Guidance (2019)

Listed building records provide an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building which has been identified by its statutory address. The description and additional information provided are supplementary and have no legal weight.

These records are not definitive historical accounts or a complete description of the building(s). If part of a building is not described it does not mean it is not listed. The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site which is known as the statutory address. Other than the name or address of a listed building, further details are provided for information purposes only. Historic Environment Scotland does not accept any liability for any loss or damage suffered as a consequence of inaccuracies in the information provided. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing. Even if a number or name is missing from a listing address it will still be listed. Listing covers both the exterior and the interior and any object or structure fixed to the building. Listing also applies to buildings or structures not physically attached but which are part of the curtilage (or land) of the listed building as long as they were erected before 1 July 1948.

While Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating listed buildings, the planning authority is responsible for determining what is covered by the listing, including what is listed through curtilage. However, for listed buildings designated or for listings amended from 1 October 2015, legal exclusions to the listing may apply.

If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the 1997 Act. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect subsequent legislation.

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Images

Edward VIII Post Box in the east gable wall of Forgandenny Post Office.
Detail of Edward VIII Post Box in Forgandenny

Printed: 01/12/2022 17:51