Listed Building

The only legal part of the listing under the Planning (Listing Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 is the address/name of site. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing – see 'About Listed Buildings' below for more information. The further details below the 'Address/Name of Site' are provided for information purposes only.

Address/Name of Site

CARNOUSTIE RUGBY CLUB PAVILION (FORMER TENNIS CLUB PAVILION) EXCLUDING YACHT CLUB EXTENSION TO SOUTH EAST, LINKS PARADE, CARNOUSTIELB52164

Status: Designated

Documents

There are no additional online documents for this record.

Summary

Category
C
Date Added
14/01/2014
Local Authority
Angus
Planning Authority
Angus
Parish
Barry
NGR
NO 56303 34279
Coordinates
356303, 734279

Description

Early 20th century. Single storey and basement, 3-bay, rough rectangular-plan, symmetrical pavilion, with 3-light canted, polygonal roof canted bay and open veranda with cast-iron Corinthian columns and decorative spandrels. Brick basement, creating deep base course, faced with painted timber and rendered nogging; timber frame and rendered nogging at ground floor. Timber boarded soffit and exposed rafter ends to overhanging eaves. Later square clock tower to roof.

INTERIOR: (seen 2012). Painted timber framing to corniced dado and moulded cornice to principal rooms. Moulded timber architraves. Predominantly remodelled circa 1970s, including partitioning.

9 pane over single pane glazing in timber frames windows; those to canted bay 6 pane over single pane. Piended, slate roof.

Statement of Special Interest

Well-detailed example of a small scale sports pavilion, which retains its distinctive cast-iron columns and decorative panels. The pavilion was constructed as a tennis pavilion and was originally flanked by tennis courts. There are still courts to the southwest. The tennis courts were one of the sporting and social activities on the parade for the many visitors to Carnoustie, and it is therefore an important representation of the town's social history. The pavilion is currently occupied by the rugby club.

Carnoustie was established circa 1810 as a planned village on land acquired by George Kinloch. Although the railway opened in 1838 the expansion of the village came in the second half of the 19th century with the opening of linen mills and in 1899 it became a police burgh. Due to its coastal location it became a popular holiday resort from the mid 19th century, which thrived in the early 20th century. It was noted in particular for its fine bathing and spacious golf links, but other attractions included al fresco Pierrot shows, band concerts, the Pavilion cinema, as well as other sporting activities, with the town becoming known as the 'Brighton of the North'.

Modern lawn tennis was established in 1874 by Major Walter Wingfield who developed a new style of the game and a new type of court in order to speed up play. The Wingfield version came to Scotland when James Pattern tested the new game outside at the Grange Cricket Ground in Edinburgh around 1874 and it soon became the version which was preferred by players.

At the time of listing (2013), the later 20th century, T-plan, flat-roofed extension to the south east, currently occupied by the yacht club, is not considered of special architectural or historic interest.

Listed as part of the sporting buildings thematic study (2012-13).

References

Bibliography

evident on 3rd edition Ordnance Survey map (surveyed 1920, published 1922). J Gifford, Buildings of Scotland: Dundee and Angus (2013) p419. www.scran.ac.uk/database/record.php?usi=000-000-153-351-C (accessed 11 April 2013). http://www.angus.gov.uk/history/features/featcarn.htm (accessed 11 April 2013). Further information courtesy of owner.

About Listed Buildings

Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating sites and places at the national level. These designations are Scheduled monuments, Listed buildings, Inventory of gardens and designed landscapes and Inventory of historic battlefields.

We make recommendations to the Scottish Government about historic marine protected areas, and the Scottish Ministers decide whether to designate.

Listing is the process that identifies, designates and provides statutory protection for buildings of special architectural or historic interest as set out in the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings which are found to be of special architectural or historic interest using the selection guidance published in Designation Policy and Selection Guidance (2019)

Listed building records provide an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building which has been identified by its statutory address. The description and additional information provided are supplementary and have no legal weight.

These records are not definitive historical accounts or a complete description of the building(s). If part of a building is not described it does not mean it is not listed. The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site which is known as the statutory address. Other than the name or address of a listed building, further details are provided for information purposes only. Historic Environment Scotland does not accept any liability for any loss or damage suffered as a consequence of inaccuracies in the information provided. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing. Even if a number or name is missing from a listing address it will still be listed. Listing covers both the exterior and the interior and any object or structure fixed to the building. Listing also applies to buildings or structures not physically attached but which are part of the curtilage (or land) of the listed building as long as they were erected before 1 July 1948.

While Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating listed buildings, the planning authority is responsible for determining what is covered by the listing, including what is listed through curtilage. However, for listed buildings designated or for listings amended from 1 October 2015, legal exclusions to the listing may apply.

If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the 1997 Act. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect subsequent legislation.

Listed building consent is required for changes to a listed building which affect its character as a building of special architectural or historic interest. The relevant planning authority is the point of contact for applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot/advice-and-support. You can contact us on 0131 668 8914 or at designations@hes.scot.

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Printed: 24/07/2024 03:49