Listed Building

The only legal part of the listing under the Planning (Listing Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 is the address/name of site. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing – see 'About Listed Buildings' below for more information. The further details below the 'Address/Name of Site' are provided for information purposes only.

Address/Name of Site

ARNISTON POLICIES, SUNKEN GARDEN, RUSTIC BRIDGE TO WEST OVER PURVIES HILL BURNLB45144

Status: Designated

Documents

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Summary

Category
B
Date Added
19/03/1998
Local Authority
Midlothian
Planning Authority
Midlothian
Parish
Borthwick
NGR
NT 32616 59167
Coordinates
332616, 659167

Description

Early 19th century with 17th century fragments; rebuilt 20th century. Flat arched, single span rustic bridge over Purvies Hill Burn.

E (PRINCIPAL) ELEVATION: 17th century carved stone parapet with rose to centre enclosed by strapwork, supported on carved corbel stones; carved foliated finial above. Angular stone upright to right; rectangular 17th century stone upright to left with advanced obelisk with spiked globe finial; single nailhead stones to each wing wall.

W ELEVATION: Segmental arched coped ashlar parapet, with central, carved scroll finial.

Statement of Special Interest

The sunken garden, to the south of Arniston House, is a highly original example of informal garden planning. Separated from the house by steeply sloping parkland, it runs either side of Purvies Hill Burn, although the garden ornaments are primarily on the north bank. Originally the ornamental urns, benches and bridges were surrounded by informal clusters of trees and plants. These were replaced by more formal carpet bedding, although today the garden ornaments themselves are all that survive (1997). The 17th century scrolled parapet (originally a lintel), rectangular upright (originally a finial on a doorway), nail head stones (originally uprights of door surround) and west parapet (originally part of a tympanum ornament) originated on Parliament House, Edinburgh, which was re faced by Robert Reid in 1803. Lord Chief Baron Robert Dundas (1758-1819) brought cartloads of the architectural fragments from Parliament house, where they "were treated as mere rubbish" (Arniston Memoirs p297), to Arniston where they were incorporated into picturesque structures in the walled and sunken gardens (see separate listings). Other fragments were acquired by famous writer and antiquarian Walter Scott for his house at Abbotsford. The foliate finial may be medieval.

References

Bibliography

PLAN OF PLEASURE GROUNDS AT ARNISTON, 1860, (SRO: RHP 5246/15/1-4).1st (1852) & 2nd (1892) Edition OS Maps; J Small, THE CASTLES AND MANSIONS OF THE LOTHIANS, (1883), Vol 1; G W T Omond, THE ARNISTON MEMOIRS, (1887), p296, 298; NMRS Photographs including "Brown wash over pencil of garden with urn and stone bench, c.1830", No 600/60 (7); AN INVENTORY OF GARDENS AND DESIGNED LANDSCAPES IN SCOTLAND, VOL 5: LOTHIAN AND BORDERS, (1986), p 10-17; ARNISTON HOUSE GUIDE BOOKS.

About Listed Buildings

Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating sites and places at the national level. These designations are Scheduled monuments, Listed buildings, Inventory of gardens and designed landscapes and Inventory of historic battlefields.

We make recommendations to the Scottish Government about historic marine protected areas, and the Scottish Ministers decide whether to designate.

Listing is the process that identifies, designates and provides statutory protection for buildings of special architectural or historic interest as set out in the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings which are found to be of special architectural or historic interest using the selection guidance published in Designation Policy and Selection Guidance (2019)

Listed building records provide an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building which has been identified by its statutory address. The description and additional information provided are supplementary and have no legal weight.

These records are not definitive historical accounts or a complete description of the building(s). If part of a building is not described it does not mean it is not listed. The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site which is known as the statutory address. Other than the name or address of a listed building, further details are provided for information purposes only. Historic Environment Scotland does not accept any liability for any loss or damage suffered as a consequence of inaccuracies in the information provided. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing. Even if a number or name is missing from a listing address it will still be listed. Listing covers both the exterior and the interior and any object or structure fixed to the building. Listing also applies to buildings or structures not physically attached but which are part of the curtilage (or land) of the listed building as long as they were erected before 1 July 1948.

While Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating listed buildings, the planning authority is responsible for determining what is covered by the listing, including what is listed through curtilage. However, for listed buildings designated or for listings amended from 1 October 2015, legal exclusions to the listing may apply.

If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the 1997 Act. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect subsequent legislation.

Listed building consent is required for changes to a listed building which affect its character as a building of special architectural or historic interest. The relevant planning authority is the point of contact for applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot/advice-and-support. You can contact us on 0131 668 8914 or at designations@hes.scot.

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