Scheduled Monument

Loch Eynort,St Maelrubha's Church,chapel and burial groundSM5665

Status: Designated

Documents

Where documents include maps, the use of this data is subject to terms and conditions (https://portal.historicenvironment.scot/termsandconditions).

The legal document available for download below constitutes the formal designation of the monument under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979. The additional details provided on this page are provided for information purposes only and do not form part of the designation. Historic Environment Scotland accepts no liability for any loss or damages arising from reliance on any inaccuracies within this additional information.

Summary

Date Added
26/04/1993
Last Date Amended
20/04/2017
Type
Ecclesiastical: burial ground, cemetery, graveyard; chapel
Local Authority
Highland
Parish
Bracadale
NGR
NG 37569 25988
Coordinates
137569, 825988

Description

The monument consists of the remains of a chapel on a site originally dedicated to St Maelrubha, of medieval origin but rebuilt after the Reformation and used as a burial chapel for the Macleods of Talisker: a cadet family of the Dunvegan branch. In the stone-walled burial ground are several sculptured tombstones of medieval date.

The church, situated at the head of Loch Eynort, is located to the E of a larger ruined church of 18th-century date. The smaller building is rectangular-plan, orientated and measures 6.5m by 3.3m within walls 0.75m thick and 2.5m to wallhead level (gable c.5.5m). The walls are rubble with freestone quoins and dressings. Small, square-headed windows pierce the walls and the interior is much lower than the external ground level. Two panels with armorial bearings commemorating the MacLeods are incorporated in the chapel walls.

Recent restoration has shown that the one on the E end of the S wall seems to have been planned for in the construction of the chapel. If this is the case the chapel was probably built or re-built in 1732. The churchyard contains several fine decorated grave-slabs of 14th/15th century date.

The area to be scheduled is irregular, measuring a maximum of 55m E-W by 40m N-S, but specifically excluding the fabric of the larger, later, ruined church, as shown in red on the accompanying map.

Statement of National Importance

The monument is of national importance because it is an example of an early medieval invocation (Kilmalrui) which demonstrates continuity of use into the 18th century with the construction of a parish church for Presbyterian use and a private burial chapel, which is likely to incorporate the remains of a medieval church. These elements provide evidence and have the potential to provide further evidence, through excavation, which may increase our understanding of their chronological relationship to each other and to any earlier building on the site, of medieval and early modern architecture, of parish evolution, of Clan history and patronage, and of the spread of the West Highland School of sculpture.

References

Bibliography

RCAHMS records the monument as NG 32 NE 1.

Reference:

RCAHMS (1928) The Royal Commission on the Ancient and Historic Monuments and Construction of Scotland. Ninth report with inventory of monuments and constructions in the Outer Hebrides, Skye and the Small Isles, No. 474, 138-9, Edinburgh.

About Scheduled Monuments

Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating sites and places at the national level. These designations are Scheduled monuments, Listed buildings, Inventory of gardens and designed landscapes and Inventory of historic battlefields.

We make recommendations to the Scottish Government about historic marine protected areas, and the Scottish Ministers decide whether to designate.

Scheduling is the process that identifies, designates and provides statutory protection for monuments and archaeological sites of national importance as set out in the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979.

We schedule sites and monuments that are found to be of national importance using the selection guidance published in Designation Policy and Selection Guidance (2019)

Scheduled monument records provide an indication of the national importance of the scheduled monument which has been identified by the description and map. The description and map (see ‘legal documents’ above) showing the scheduled area is the designation of the monument under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979. The statement of national importance and additional information provided are supplementary and provided for general information purposes only. Historic Environment Scotland accepts no liability for any loss or damages arising from reliance on any inaccuracies within the statement of national importance or additional information. These records are not definitive historical or archaeological accounts or a complete description of the monument(s).

The format of scheduled monument records has changed over time. Earlier records will usually be brief. Some information will not have been recorded and the map will not be to current standards. Even if what is described and what is mapped has changed, the monument is still scheduled.

Scheduled monument consent is required to carry out certain work, including repairs, to scheduled monuments. Applications for scheduled monument consent are made to us. We are happy to discuss your proposals with you before you apply and we do not charge for advice or consent. More information about consent and how to apply for it can be found on our website at www.historicenvironment.scot.

Find out more about scheduling and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot/advice-and-support. You can contact us on 0131 668 8914 or at designations@hes.scot.

Images

Loch Eynort, St Maelrubha's Chapel, looking northeast, view of chapel on a bright, sunny day with part cloudy sky
Loch Eynort, St Maelrubha's Chapel, looking northeast, view of churches and graveyard on a bright, sunny day with part cloudy sky

Printed: 30/09/2022 06:56