Scheduled Monument

Castle CampbellSM13611

Status: Designated

Documents

Where documents include maps, the use of this data is subject to terms and conditions (https://portal.historicenvironment.scot/termsandconditions).

Summary

Date Added
02/12/2015
Type
Secular: castle
Local Authority
Clackmannanshire
Parish
Dollar
NGR
NS 96124 99290
Coordinates
296124, 699290

Legal Description

The monument comprises Castle Campbell and an area around it where buried evidence of associated defences, buildings and gardens is expected to survive. The castle is the product of several periods of development dating to between about AD 1200 to 1600, and is visible as three ranges of upstanding buildings set around the N, E and S sides of a courtyard. The tower occupies a highly prominent position on a rocky spur of the Ochil Hills at the head of Dollar Glen. It is cut off from the E, W and S by the ravines of the Burn of Sorrow and Burn of Care. It stands about 200m above sea level, looking out over Dollar and the Forth Valley.

The scheduled area is irregular on plan, to include the remains of the castle and an area around it within which evidence for the castle's construction, use and abandonment is expected to survive, as shown in red on the accompanying map. The scheduling excludes the above-ground elements of all modern structures, fixtures and fittings, including modern fences, signage, electrical apparatus, lighting, stairs and walkways, barriers, and kitchen fittings. The monument was last scheduled in 1950; the present amendment provides documents to modern standards.

Description

The monument comprises Castle Campbell and an area around it where buried evidence of associated defences, buildings and gardens is expected to survive. The castle is the product of several periods of development dating to between about AD 1200 to 1600, and is visible as three ranges of upstanding buildings set around the N, E and S sides of a courtyard. The tower occupies a highly prominent position on a rocky spur of the Ochil Hills at the head of Dollar Glen. It is cut off from the E, W and S by the ravines of the Burn of Sorrow and Burn of Care. It stands about 200m above sea level, looking out over Dollar and the Forth Valley.

The N range contains the earliest fabric and derives from a massive rectangular tower-house constructed between the later 14th and mid-15th centuries. The tower-house is a roofed building with four main storeys plus a garret. The ground floor, 1st floor and 3rd floor are vaulted with barrel vaults, while the 2nd and 3rd floors are divided by a wooden floor resting on corbels. The 3rd floor vault is a secondary insertion. The walls are 2.3m thick. The first floor hall measures 8.5m E-W by 4.9m transversely. The tower-house stands on a rounded mound which resembles a motte and is potentially the core of an earlier timber castle. The S side of the courtyard is occupied by a hall and chamber range in a style indicating construction around 1500. The E range has a ground floor loggia and upper floor galleries built around 1600, but incorporates an earlier building. The terraced garden to the S may also date to around 1600.

The scheduled area is irregular on plan, to include the remains of the castle and an area around it within which evidence for the castle's construction, use and abandonment is expected to survive, as shown in red on the accompanying map. The scheduling excludes the above-ground elements of all modern structures, fixtures and fittings, including modern fences, signage, electrical apparatus, lighting, stairs and walkways, barriers, and kitchen fittings. The monument was last scheduled in 1950; the present amendment provides documents to modern standards.

Statement of National Importance

The monument has considerable potential to add significantly to understanding of medieval and post-medieval domestic fortified dwellings, their architecture, construction, maintenance, development and abandonment. The upstanding buildings retain their structural and decorative characteristics to a marked degree, incorporating many significant architectural features. The monument is particularly important for demonstrating the development of a castle from early keep to later courtyard castle and Renaissance residence. There is also high potential for the survival of important buried archaeological evidence, including traces of a potential motte and bailey castle of earlier date and artefacts and palaeoenvironmental evidence that can enhance our understanding of the daily domestic life of the inhabitants and their society and economy. The monument would have been a highly prominent part of the contemporary landscape during its occupation and remains a significant landmark in the modern landscape. Because of the prominence of its owners, particularly the Campbells, there is rich potential for documentary records to add to understanding of the castle and its functions. Our understanding of the form, function and character of castles in eastern Scotland would be diminished if this monument was to be lost or damaged. Castles have a significant place in the national consciousness and Castle Campbell is visited and valued by large numbers of people.

References

Bibliography

RCAHMS records the monument as NS99NE 2. The record includes a full bibliography.

Historic Environment Scotland Properties

Castle Campbell

https://www.historicenvironment.scot/visit-a-place/places/castle-campbell

Find out more

Related Designations

  1. CASTLE CAMPBELLGDL00089

    Designation Type
    Garden & Designed Landscape
    Status
    Designated

About Scheduled Monuments

Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating sites and places at the national level. These designations are Scheduled monuments, Listed buildings, Inventory of gardens and designed landscapes and Inventory of historic battlefields.

We make recommendations to the Scottish Government about historic marine protected areas, and the Scottish Ministers decide whether to designate.

Scheduling is the process that identifies, designates and provides statutory protection for monuments and archaeological sites of national importance as set out in the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979.

We schedule sites and monuments that are found to be of national importance using the selection guidance published in Designation Policy and Selection Guidance (2019)

Scheduled monument records provide an indication of the national importance of the scheduled monument which has been identified by the description and map. The description and map showing the scheduled area is the legal part of the scheduling. The statement of national importance and additional information provided are supplementary. These records are not definitive historical or archaeological accounts or a complete description of the monument(s).

The format of scheduled monument records has changed over time. Earlier records will usually be brief. Some information will not have been recorded and the map will not be to current standards. Even if what is described and what is mapped has changed, the monument is still scheduled.

Scheduled monument consent is required to carry out certain work, including repairs, to scheduled monuments. Applications for scheduled monument consent are made to us. We are happy to discuss your proposals with you before you apply and we do not charge for advice or consent. More information about consent and how to apply for it can be found on our website at www.historicenvironment.scot.

Find out more about scheduling and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot/advice-and-support. You can contact us on 0131 668 8914 or at designations@hes.scot.

Images

There are no images available for this record, you may want to check Canmore for images relating to Castle Campbell

There are no images available for this record.

Search Canmore

Printed: 26/06/2019 02:45