Listed Building

The only legal part of the listing is the address/name of site. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing – see ‘About Listed Buildings’ below for more information.

REDCASTLELB7975

Status: Designated

Documents

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Summary

Category
B
Date Added
25/03/1971
Local Authority
Highland
Planning Authority
Highland
Parish
Killearnan
NGR
NH 58386 49508
Coordinates
258386, 849508

Description

Dated 1641, incorporating earlier work, rubble with ashlar

flush quoins and chamfered margins, 3-storey, approximate

L-plan with higher square-plan stair-tower in re-entrant

angle and smaller stairtower with canted south-west angle

corbelled to square at third floor at south-east angle

of main block. Circular bartizans at south angles of

jamb and square caphouse at north-west angle, borne on 2

rows of individual moulded corbels divided by a continuous

quirked edge-roll; parapet of principal stair tower borne or

corbels of similar profile. Alterations and additions, William

Burn, 1840 3-storey block infilling re-entrant angle of south

jamb and main stair tower, plain 2-storey addition with

crowstepped gables at north; single storey arcaded loggia

(now demolished) across south front; reconstruction of upper

parts of bartizans; addition of circular bartizan at north

-east angle; general enlargement of windows; remodelling of

wallhead, defined by a bold continuous roll moulding. Stone

barrel vaults at ground floor. Roofless.

Statement of Special Interest

Built on site of Castle of Edradour believed to have been

built by David, brother of William the Lion, in 1179. It

passed into the possession of the Mackenzies by the early

17th century. Rory Mackenzie succeeded to Redcastle in 1629

and his own new strong house of Redcastle was sacked by The

Covenanters in 1649. (Scottish Historical Society, WARDLAW

MS, 341; Duncan Warrand, SOME MACKENZIE PEDIGREES, 72) In 1790

Redcastle was sold by the Mackenzies to Grant of Shewghie

and was sold again in 1824 to Sir William after his death to

Colonel Hugh Duncan Baillie of Dochfour who commissioned the

Burn remodelling. (Joseph Mitchell, REMINISCENCES OF MY LIFE

IN THE HIGHLANDS, i, 251).

References

Bibliography

David MacGibbon and Thomas Ross THE CASTELLATED AND DOMESTIC ARCHITECTURE OF SCOTLAND; iii, 623-5; Nigel Tranter, THE

FORTIFIED HOUSE IN SCOTLAND, v, 112-3; Howard Colvin,

A DICTIONARY OF BRITISH ARCHITECTS, 165; INVERNESS COURIER,

March 4, 1840; National Monuments Record for Scotland Record

Sheet.

About Listed Buildings

Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating sites and places at the national level. These designations are Scheduled monuments, Listed buildings, Inventory of gardens and designed landscapes and Inventory of historic battlefields.

We make recommendations to the Scottish Government about historic marine protected areas, and the Scottish Ministers decide whether to designate.

Listing is the process that identifies, designates and provides statutory protection for buildings of special architectural or historic interest as set out in the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings which are found to be of special architectural or historic interest using the selection guidance published in Designation Policy and Selection Guidance (2019)

Listed building records provide an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building which has been identified by its statutory address. The description and additional information provided are supplementary and have no legal weight.

These records are not definitive historical accounts or a complete description of the building(s). If part of a building is not described it does not mean it is not listed. The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site which is known as the statutory address. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing. Even if a number or name is missing from a listing address it will still be listed. Listing covers both the exterior and the interior and any object or structure fixed to the building. Listing also applies to buildings or structures not physically attached but which are part of the curtilage (or land) of the listed building as long as they were erected before 1 July 1948.

While Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating listed buildings, the planning authority is responsible for determining what is covered by the listing, including what is listed through curtilage. However, for listed buildings designated or for listings amended from 1 October 2015, legal exclusions to the listing may apply.

If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the 1997 Act. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect subsequent legislation.

Listed building consent is required for changes to a listed building which affect its character as a building of special architectural or historic interest. The relevant planning authority is the point of contact for applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot/advice-and-support. You can contact us on 0131 668 8914 or at designations@hes.scot.

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