Listed Building

The only legal part of the listing is the address/name of site. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing – see ‘About Listed Buildings’ below for more information.

KIRKLISTON VILLAGE NEWLISTON ROAD, FORMER KIRKLISTON DISTILLERY, PRODUCTION BLOCK INCLUDING MALT BARNS AND DOUBLE KILN AND SEPARATE STILL HOUSELB45644

Status: Designated

Documents

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Summary

Category
C
Date Added
03/09/1998
Local Authority
Edinburgh
Planning Authority
Edinburgh
Burgh
Edinburgh
NGR
NT 12184 74213
Coordinates
312184, 674213

Description

Mid 19th to early 20th century with alterations. Rectangular-plan grain processing block comprising granary and double kiln linked by pair of lower-height malt barns and deposit store adjoining kilns to opposite side; oriented W-E; formerly part of whisky distillery complex. 5-stage still house with pyramidal roof adjoining later red sandstone production block with industrial chimney. Coursed sandstone and sandstone rubble with ashlar dressings. Predominantly slate roofs.

GRAIN PROCESSING BLOCK: GRANARY: late 19th/early 20th century. Sited at W end of main grain processing range. Tall gabled malt barn, oriented N-S, with gabled grain elevator housing set at centre of ridge. Blind panels, arranged as Venetian window, to S elevation. Single storey lean-to to W elevation. Window set in gablehead to N elevation; 3 catslide dormers to each pitch of roof. Adjoins narrow ends of pair of malt barns to N and E. MALT BARNS: pair of parallel adjoining malt barns; oriented E-W; that to N probably mid 19th century; single storey and basement 9-bay range with piended roof at W end; later coped gable to E end where block appears truncated (does not adjoin kiln). S malt barn dated 1914 on central panel; rendered 2-storey 6-bay range; lean-to to ground floor; 6th bay 2 and a half storeys with gabled dormer and tower-like structure, probably formerly housing elevator, above to rear; adjoins double kiln to E. DOUBLE KILN: probably late 19th century. Sited at centre of main grain processing range; oriented N-S. 4-storey structure with tall piended roof and paired pagoda ventilators. Adjoins deposit store and ancillary ranges to E. DEPOSIT STORE AND ANCILLARY RANGES: mid 19th century (possibly incorporating earlier fabric). Grouped as 3 sides of courtyard to E of double kiln. Tall deposit store; oriented E-W along N side of block; gable end to E built up in brick; 3 catslide dormers to each pitch of roof. 2 storey 4-bay ancillary range adjoins at right angles to S; oriented N-S; gabled loading bay to E side; piended roof to S. Single and 2-storey, 9-bay ancillary range, partly built up in brick to N side; oriented E-W along S side of block and extending to E of production block; 2 loading doors to 2-storey section.

STILL HOUSE: Mid to later 19th century. 5-stage, square-plan tower with pyramidal roof and louvred ventilator. Openings (largely altered) mainly to S and W elevations.

INTERIORS: not inspected (1998).

Statement of Special Interest

The most significant remaining structures on a large and much altered distillery site dating back to the late 18th century. The most interesting building is probably the patent still house, a rare (one of two known in Scotland) surviving example of a tower-like structure designed to accommodate a Coffey still, which comprised a pair of tall columns (an analyser and a rectifier). The distillery is illustrated in Alfred Barnard's 'The Whisky Distilleries of the UK' (published 1887). However the only recognisable buildings are the patent still house and a brick industrial chimney of square plan to the east of it. The south malt barn appears to have been substantially rebuilt in 1914, probably for a Saladin malting. The distillery was founded by George Simpson & Co in 1795-9. It passed through various ownerships, including that of Andrew Stein & Co, which later (in 1877) became a founder member of the Distillers Company Ltd and was operated with both pot and patented stills. Latterly Kirkliston was adapted to process yeast and malt extract for the Distillers Company.

References

Bibliography

Appears in different form on First Edition ORDNANCE SURVEY MAP; 1:2500; Linlithgowshire Sheet VI8; Alfred Barnard, THE WHISKY DISTILLERIES OF THE UK (1887) pp333-36; appears more of less in present form on 2nd Edition ORDNANCE SURVEY MAP; 1:2500; Linlithgowshire Sheet VI.8; Michael S Moss and John R Hume, THE MAKING OF SCOTCH WHISKY (1981) pp242 & 280.

About Listed Buildings

Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating sites and places at the national level. These designations are Scheduled monuments, Listed buildings, Inventory of gardens and designed landscapes and Inventory of historic battlefields.

We make recommendations to the Scottish Government about historic marine protected areas, and the Scottish Ministers decide whether to designate.

Listing is the process that identifies, designates and provides statutory protection for buildings of special architectural or historic interest as set out in the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings which are found to be of special architectural or historic interest using the selection guidance published in Designation Policy and Selection Guidance (2019)

Listed building records provide an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building which has been identified by its statutory address. The description and additional information provided are supplementary and have no legal weight.

These records are not definitive historical accounts or a complete description of the building(s). If part of a building is not described it does not mean it is not listed. The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site which is known as the statutory address. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing. Even if a number or name is missing from a listing address it will still be listed. Listing covers both the exterior and the interior and any object or structure fixed to the building. Listing also applies to buildings or structures not physically attached but which are part of the curtilage (or land) of the listed building as long as they were erected before 1 July 1948.

While Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating listed buildings, the planning authority is responsible for determining what is covered by the listing, including what is listed through curtilage. However, for listed buildings designated or for listings amended from 1 October 2015, legal exclusions to the listing may apply.

If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the 1997 Act. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect subsequent legislation.

Listed building consent is required for changes to a listed building which affect its character as a building of special architectural or historic interest. The relevant planning authority is the point of contact for applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot/advice-and-support. You can contact us on 0131 668 8914 or at designations@hes.scot.

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