Listed Building

The only legal part of the listing is the address/name of site. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing – see ‘About Listed Buildings’ below for more information.

GLEN TANAR ESTATE, ST LESMO'S CHAPEL, INCLUDING BOUNDARY WALLLB44

Status: Designated

Documents

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Summary

Category
B
Date Added
24/11/1972
Supplementary Information Updated
06/02/2019
Local Authority
Aberdeenshire
Planning Authority
Aberdeenshire
Parish
Aboyne And Glen Tanar
National Park
Cairngorms
NGR
NO 47923 96051
Coordinates
347923, 796051

Description

Circa 1870, incorporating arched gate and using stones from 17th century Braeloine Farmhouse. Single storey, 3-bay, rectangular-plan chapel, with late 19th century addition, probably by George Truefitt, to SW and 1937 tower to NW. Granite rubble with terracotta cherry-cocking; squared and snecked, rough-faced addition to SW, finely finished to margins. Rubble base course; long and short quoins; chamfered reveals; timber eaves course.

SE (ENTRANCE) ELEVATION: near-symmetrical; regular fenestration to each bay; 17th century round-headed arch to outer left, with roll moulding, decorative pink and grey granite floor; late 19th century addition behind, doorway with stop-chamfered reveals, boarded timber door with iron studs; bipartite, pointed-arched window to single bay, late 19th century bay to outer left.

NE ELEVATION: symmetrical; gabled, 2 small windows set in gablehead; replacement granite cross to apex.

NW ELEVATION: asymmetrical; 4-bay; window to penultimate bay to left and bay to outer left; 1937 piend-roofed tower advanced to penultimate bay to right, slate-roofed porch with modern boarded timber door to right return, window to re-entrant angle to right; window to bay to right. 2-bay, late 19th century addition to outer right, bipartite pointed-arched window to bay to left, bowed bay advanced to right.

SW ELEVATION: gabled; ground floor obscured by advanced 2-bay, late 19th century addition, quadripartite pointed-arched window to left, pointed-arched window to right, outer right obscured by tree. Bell mounted on timber panel reading "S. LESMO/S" set in gablehead.

Leaded stained glass windows, barred or protected by wire mesh. Grey slate roof with stone ridge; grass roof to late 19th century addition. Stone skews with simple skewputs. Coped circular wallhead stack to late 19th century addition. Cast-iron rainwater goods.

INTERIOR: Glen Tanar granite flagged floor; granite altar; rustic timber pews, roof and lectern.

BOUNDARY WALL: low granite rubble boundary wall surrounds chapel.

Statement of Special Interest

The Glen Tanar Estate was originally a deer forest which was part of the Aboyne Castle Estate. In 1869 Sir William Cunliffe Brooks, a Manchester banker and MP, bought the estate from the 10th Marquis of Huntly. His grave survives in the graveyard, and is a replica of an ancient cross from Aboyne Castle. Brooks employed Thomas Mawson to layout the garden and estate, George Truefitt as architect, and 250 masons to construct the buildings, built of granite quarried locally. Built on the site of the "auld hoose" of Braeloine (featured on 1st Edition OS Map), and incorporating its ancient arch, St Lesmo's Chapel originally had a heather thatched roof. It was built as the Brooks family chapel, consecrated by the Bishop of Aberdeen and Orkney on the 15th of November 1871. St. Lesmo was supposedly a holy hermit who lived in Glen Tanar, and introduced Christianity to the area (d. AD 731). The saint is remembered in one of the churches stained glass windows. George Coats followed Brooks as owner of Glen Tanar, and indeed became the first Lord Glentanar. The 2nd Baron of Glentanar was a musician, and in 1936 acquired the organ (which dates from 1874) from his brother-in-law, the 5th Duke of Wellington, the pipes of which are housed in the tower to the NW.

References

Bibliography

1st (1866-67) and 2nd (1902) EDITION OS MAPS; NMRS Photo Album No 194, GEORGE TRUEFITT AT GLEN TANAR 1875-85 DRAWINGS, p17, 20, 24, 47; F H Groome, ORDNANCE GAZETTEER OF SCOTLAND: A SURVEY OF SCOTTISH TOPOGRAPHY, STATISTICAL, BIOGRAPHICAL, AND HISTORICAL, (1886), Vol 1, p31; J Coutts, DICTIONARY OF DEESIDE, (1899), p213-4; A I McConnochie, DEESIDE, (1900), p112; G M Fraser, "Glen Tanar", THE DEESIDE FIELD, (1925), p29-30; H Hamilton (ed), THE THIRD STATISTICAL ACCOUNT OF SCOTLAND: THE COUNTY OF ABERDEEN, (1960), p427; F Wyness, ROYAL VALLEY: THE STORY OF THE ABERDEENSHIRE DEE, (1968), p25; AN INVENTORY OF GARDENS AND DESIGNED LANDSCAPES IN SCOTLAND, VOL 3: HIGHLAND, ORKNEY AND GRAMPIAN, (1986), p228; PANEL IN GLEN TANAR VISITOR CENTRE; NMRS Photographs.

About Listed Buildings

Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating sites and places at the national level. These designations are Scheduled monuments, Listed buildings, Inventory of gardens and designed landscapes and Inventory of historic battlefields.

We make recommendations to the Scottish Government about historic marine protected areas, and the Scottish Ministers decide whether to designate.

Listing is the process that identifies, designates and provides statutory protection for buildings of special architectural or historic interest as set out in the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings which are found to be of special architectural or historic interest using the selection guidance published in Designation Policy and Selection Guidance (2019)

Listed building records provide an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building which has been identified by its statutory address. The description and additional information provided are supplementary and have no legal weight.

These records are not definitive historical accounts or a complete description of the building(s). If part of a building is not described it does not mean it is not listed. The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site which is known as the statutory address. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing. Even if a number or name is missing from a listing address it will still be listed. Listing covers both the exterior and the interior and any object or structure fixed to the building. Listing also applies to buildings or structures not physically attached but which are part of the curtilage (or land) of the listed building as long as they were erected before 1 July 1948.

While Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating listed buildings, the planning authority is responsible for determining what is covered by the listing, including what is listed through curtilage. However, for listed buildings designated or for listings amended from 1 October 2015, legal exclusions to the listing may apply.

If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the 1997 Act. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect subsequent legislation.

Listed building consent is required for changes to a listed building which affect its character as a building of special architectural or historic interest. The relevant planning authority is the point of contact for applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot/advice-and-support. You can contact us on 0131 668 8914 or at designations@hes.scot.

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Printed: 17/11/2019 07:40