Skip to content
Print
Listed Building

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site only. All other information in the record is not statutory.

OLD PIER, OLD TOLBOOTH OF STONEHAVEN INCLUDING BOUNDARY WALLS AND GATESLB41655

Status: Designated

Documents

There are no additional online documents for this record.

Summary

Information

  • Category: A
  • Date Added: 18/08/1972

Location

  • Local Authority: Aberdeenshire
  • Planning Authority: Aberdeenshire
  • Burgh: Stonehaven

National Grid Reference

  • NGR: NO 87804 85521
  • Coordinates: 387804, 785521

Description

Late 16th century, N wing added 17th century, restored 1963. 2-storey, L-plan, crowstepped tolbooth. Local sandstone and conglomerate rubble; some polished ashlar dressings; chamfered openings. Vertical-boarding to doors and reveals.

S (PRINCIPAL) ELEVATION: door in bay to left of centre at ground, and 2-leaf door to later broad opening at right; 1st floor with wide loading door (now glazed with modern iron balustrade) to right of centre, 3 blocked slits and 2 windows to left; further window to outer right.

W ELEVATION: 3-bay elevation incorporating gabled bay to right with forestair rising from outer right leading to recessed door at 1st floor centre and window to right. Later broad opening with 2-leaf door to centre at ground and further pedestrian door immediately to left, 2 windows at 1st floor flanking dominant wallhead stack.

E ELEVATION: gabled elevation with curved wall (see below) abutting at left angle, window to left at 1st floor and small blind opening to right, further window in gablehead.

N (REAR) ELEVATION: asymmetrically-fenestrated elevation with advanced crowstepped gable at outer right.

Predominantly 12-pane glazing pattern in replacement timber sash and case windows. Graded grey slates. Small rooflight to rear. Coped ashlar wallhead and gablehead stacks; ashlar-coped crowsteps with beak skewputts.

BOUNDARY WALLS AND GATES: flat-coped, coursed rubble, semicircular-plan wall forming courtyard at E, with 2-leaf iron grid-pattern vehicular gate set in wall.

INTERIOR: largely altered but ground floor of N wing retains rubble and flagstone floors. Curved recess to W of S wing (probably housed free-standing stove).

Statement of Special Interest

The Old Tolbooth is the oldest surviving building in Stonehaven. It was probably built as a store in the late sixteenth century by George Keith, 5th Earl Marischal (founder of Marischal College in Aberdeen), during the construction of nearby Dunnottar Castle, and whose arms are said to have appeared on a skewputt at the west gable. After Stonehaven became the county town in 1600, the building was used as tolbooth, courthouse and prison. The courthouse was situated on the first floor, with the ground floor as prison and the enclosed area forming an exercise yard. After 1767, when new County Buildings were opened in Dunnottar Avenue, it was also used to store grain, coal and lime. One of the most famous episodes of the building's history was the imprisonment of the three Episcopal clergymen of Stonehaven, Muchalls and Drumlithie during the winter of 1748-9, for refusing to pray for George II, and for conducting services for congregations of upwards of five people. During their imprisonment the clergymen conducted secret baptisms (through a barred window) of children brought to the tolbooth hidden in fishing creels. The image was popularised by the Victorian painter George Washington Brownlow, and is further illustrated in a stained glass window at the category 'A' listed St James James the Great Episcopal Church in Arbuthnott Street. Two wall-mounted metal plaques to the outer left of the principal elevation commemorate the erection, history and restoration of the building. The Old Tolbooth is now (2005) used as a museum and restaurant.

References

Bibliography

RCAHMS TOLBOOTHS AND TOWN-HOUSES (1996), pp189-90. A Watt THE TOLBOOTH (1963). Anderson THE BLACK BOOK OF KINCARDINESHIRE. J Napier STONEHAVEN AND ITS HISTORICAL ASSOCIATIONS (1869), pp3-8. F Eeks STONEHAVEN HISTORICAL AND DESCRIPTIVE (1897), pp19-20. 'R' PICTURESQUE STONEHAVEN (1899), pp13-17. I Henderson ANGUS AND THE MEARNS (1990), p107.

About Designations

Listed Buildings

Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for the designation of buildings, monuments, gardens and designed landscapes and historic battlefields. We also advise Scottish Ministers on the designation of historic marine protected areas.

Listing is the way that a building or structure of special architectural or historic interest is recognised by law through the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings of special architectural or historic interest using the criteria published in the Historic Environment Scotland Policy Statement.

The statutory listing address is the legal part of the listing. The information in the listed building record gives an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building(s). It is not a definitive historical account or a complete description of the building(s). The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

Listing covers both the exterior and the interior. Listing can cover structures not mentioned which are part of the curtilage of the building, such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. The planning authority is responsible for advising on what is covered by the listing including the curtilage of a listed building. For information about curtilage see www.historicenvironment.scot. Since 1 October 2015 we have been able to exclude items from a listing. If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the Historic Environment Scotland Act 2014. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect current legislation.

If you want to alter, extend or demolish a listed building you need to contact your planning authority to see if you need listed building consent. The planning authority is the main point of contact for all applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot. You can contact us on 0131 668 8716 or at designations@hes.scot.

Images

There are no images available for this record.

Map

There is no map available for this record.

Printed: 25/08/2016 21:10