Listed Building

The only legal part of the listing under the Planning (Listing Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 is the address/name of site. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing – see 'About Listed Buildings' below for more information. The further details below the 'Address/Name of Site' are provided for information purposes only.

Address/Name of Site

QUEEN STREET, QUEEN MARY'S HOUSE WITH OUTBUILDINGS, BOUNDARY WALL AND RAILINGSLB35591

Status: Designated

Documents

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Summary

Category
A
Date Added
16/03/1971
Local Authority
Scottish Borders
Planning Authority
Scottish Borders
Burgh
Jedburgh
NGR
NT 65162 20674
Coordinates
365162, 620674

Description

Late 16th century urban laird's house with subsequent minor alterations. T-plan with 3-storey 4-bay oblong hall block and square 4-storey stair tower abutting to the E, forming stroke of T. Exposed rubble with dressings of local yellow, grey and red freestone; relieving arches to most windows; crowstepped gabled with gablehead stacks. Hall block with swept-roofed dormers breaking eaves.

W (QUEEN STREET) ELEVATION: regular 3-storey 4-bay front, centre bays grouped together. Blank at ground, except for small windows at centre and to right; arched pend to far right with hoodmould; recarved 17th century panel of arms above in much later frame, displacing 1st floor window to left. Windows to all bays of 1st and 2nd floors; 2nd floor windows breaking eaves with swept dormerheads.

N ELEVATION: gabled right jamb advanced; blank except for small window to 1st floor to left, created in blocked opening with relieving arch; gablehead stack. Jamb to left at right angles, with small windows at 1st and 3rd floors.

E ELEVATION: advanced gabled 4-storey tower at centre, with small window to all floors except ground; gablehead stack. Flanking recessed 3-storey range; to left, shallow arched pend at ground and small window to right, large window at 1st floor, 2nd floor with half-dormer as above; in reentrant angle round stair tower to upper floors corbelled out above ground floor, conical roof with iron ball finial; to right, 2 windows at ground; left section of wall above corbelled out to accomodate fireplace, window inserted at 1st floor and later blocked; window to right at 1st floor; large pibartite half-dormer to 2nd floor, as above (timber mullion).

S ELEVATION: blank advanced gable to left, with blocked door to right and small window to left at ground; gablehead stack. Tower to right with door at ground, small windows to upper floors; stair tower in reentrant angle as above.

Windows a variety of timber sash and case and casement. Grey slates; coped dressed rubble stacks. Corbel skews.

INTERIOR: heavily restored and converted to museum/ visitor centre by Page and Park Architects, Glasgow, 1986; door created in N wall of pend giving access to vaulted entrance lobby, vaulted rubble hall beyond with projecting fireplace at N end; spacious scale and platt stair terminating at 1st floor, continuing as left-handed turret stair; large 1st floor room plastered with continuous corbel course on long walls supporting ceiling; fireplaces on N and E walls, latter with corbelled lintel; smaller room to S with much restored panelling; 2nd floor rooms with modern tongue and groove panelling, small fireplace with corbelled lintel in NE corner, coombed ceiling.

BOUNDARY WALLS AND OUTBUILDINGS: ashlar saddleback coped rubble boundary wall; lowered at front of house to Queen Street, with cast-iron railings; similar gates. Rubble lean-to shed with corrugated iron roof abutts wall at S of site, close to temporary toilet enclosure. There is a Victorian cast-iron street lamp to the immediate N of the house, in its garden.

Statement of Special Interest

The house probably became part of a continuous street, explaining the openings on the N and S walls, and more particularly the pend, which would have been created to give access to the door. Other major alterations include the abandonment of the original fireplace at the 1st floor in the 17th century and the creation of a new one in the N wall; the top courses of stair turret were altered at the end of the 19th century, perhaps when the thatch was removed; the thatch was replaced

by red tiles, these in turn being replaced by slates in the recent restoration. The arms in the panel are of Wigmer and Scott, and this, combined with the late date of the building suggest that it is very unlikely that this is where Mary stayed (she rented her accommodation from Lady Ferniehurst, who was not a Scott, in 1566). The house was purchaed by F S Oliver of Edgerston in 1928 and presented to the town; preservation and restoration was carried out by J Wilson Paterson of H M Office of Works (including reopening the pend and laying out the garden), and it was opened as a museum by Mrs Oliver on 28th August 1930.

De-scheduled 15.12.98.

References

Bibliography

RCAHMS INVENTORY Vol I No 418 figs 255, 256, 262. NATIONAL ART SURVEY 1900 and MINISTRY OF WORKS DRAWINGS 1929 NMRS RXD/246/1-4. NEW STATISTICAL ACCOUNT Vol III 1845 p11. Sir George Douglas A HISTORY OF THE BORDER COUNTIES EDINBURGH 1899 p304. James Watson SMAIL'S GUILDE TO JEDBURGH AND VICINITY 4th ed. 1880 p25. Simpson and Stevenson HISTORIC JEDBURGH SBS 1981 pp9,13. F Groome ORDNANCE GAZETTER IV p329. N Tranter THE FORTIFIED HOUSE IN SCOTLAND I p150. McGibbon and Ross CASTELLATED AND DOMESTIC ARCHITECTURE OF SCOTLAND 1892 IV pp112-116. W Wells Mabon OFFICIAL GUIDE OF THE JEDBURGH TOWN COUNCIL. Robert Hugill BORDERLAND CASTLES AND PELES 1970 p157-9. Ordnance Survey Namebook. MARY QUEEN OF SCOTS HOUSE GUIDE BOOK Roxburgh District Council 1989.

About Listed Buildings

Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating sites and places at the national level. These designations are Scheduled monuments, Listed buildings, Inventory of gardens and designed landscapes and Inventory of historic battlefields.

We make recommendations to the Scottish Government about historic marine protected areas, and the Scottish Ministers decide whether to designate.

Listing is the process that identifies, designates and provides statutory protection for buildings of special architectural or historic interest as set out in the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings which are found to be of special architectural or historic interest using the selection guidance published in Designation Policy and Selection Guidance (2019)

Listed building records provide an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building which has been identified by its statutory address. The description and additional information provided are supplementary and have no legal weight.

These records are not definitive historical accounts or a complete description of the building(s). If part of a building is not described it does not mean it is not listed. The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site which is known as the statutory address. Other than the name or address of a listed building, further details are provided for information purposes only. Historic Environment Scotland does not accept any liability for any loss or damage suffered as a consequence of inaccuracies in the information provided. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing. Even if a number or name is missing from a listing address it will still be listed. Listing covers both the exterior and the interior and any object or structure fixed to the building. Listing also applies to buildings or structures not physically attached but which are part of the curtilage (or land) of the listed building as long as they were erected before 1 July 1948.

While Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating listed buildings, the planning authority is responsible for determining what is covered by the listing, including what is listed through curtilage. However, for listed buildings designated or for listings amended from 1 October 2015, legal exclusions to the listing may apply.

If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the 1997 Act. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect subsequent legislation.

Listed building consent is required for changes to a listed building which affect its character as a building of special architectural or historic interest. The relevant planning authority is the point of contact for applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot/advice-and-support. You can contact us on 0131 668 8914 or at designations@hes.scot.

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