Listed Building

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site only. All other information in the record is not statutory.

POTARCH BRIDGE, OVER RIVER DEELB3095

Status: Designated

Documents

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Summary

Category
A
Date Added
16/04/1971
Supplementary Information Updated
09/06/1994
Local Authority
Aberdeenshire
Planning Authority
Aberdeenshire
Parish
Birse
NGR
NO 60759 97312
Coordinates
360759, 797312

Description

Thomas Telford, 1811-1813. 3-span segmental-arched bridge over River Dee. Tooled, coursed granite with finely finished arch rings and piers. Triangular cut-waters extended up forming 4 half-hexagonal refuges to each parapet; coped parapet; sharply splayed wing walls.

Statement of Special Interest

Attempts to collect money to build a bridge on the site of Potarch Bridge began in 1698, however it was not until the 19th century that the Parish of Birse was finally linked to North Deeside, and the Deeside turnpike road to Aberdeen. Indeed the OSA points out that "...in no place is a bridge so much wanted, nor could one be built that would accommodate this parish, and the public in general so much as at Pot-arch, over the Dee" (OSA, p123). The bridge was funded partly by the Government, but mainly by the Inneses of Balnacraig and Ballogie. Despite flood damage to the bridge in the course of building and shortly afterwards the bridge survives in exceptionally fine condition. Its length is 200 feet, the largest span is 70 feet, flanked to left and right by 2 65 feet arches. Fairs used to be held near the bridge, however the market stance is now unused. Part in Kincardine O'Neil Parish. Change of Category B to A, 9 June 1994.

References

Bibliography

J Sinclair, THE STATISTICAL ACCOUNT OF SCOTLAND, (1793), p123; J Robertson, TOPOGRAPHICAL & MILITARY MAP OF THE COUNTIES OF ABERDEEN: BANFF & KINCARDINE, (1822); THE NEW STATISTICAL ACCOUNT OF SCOTLAND, Vol. XII, (1845), p797, 790, 1066; R Dinnie, AN ACCOUNT OF THE PARISH OF BIRSE, HISTORICAL, STATISTICAL & ANTIQUARIAN, (1865), p104; 1st (1869) and 2nd (1903) EDITION OS MAPS; F H Groome, ORDNANCE GAZETTEER OF SCOTLAND: A SURVEY OF SCOTTISH TOPOGRAPHY, STATISTICAL, BIOGRAPHICAL, AND HISTORICAL, (1886), Vol. 1, p30, 159; A I McConnochie, DEESIDE, (1900), p99; A I McConochie, THE DEESIDE FIELD, (1925), p33; L T C Rolt, THOMAS TELFORD, (1958), p72; H Hamilton (ed), THE THIRD STATISTICAL ACCOUNT OF SCOTLAND: THE COUNTY OF ABERDEEN, (1960), p419; ; F Wyness, ROYAL VALLEY: THE STORY OF THE ABERDEENSHIRE DEE, (1968), p228, 337; J R Hume, THE INDUSTRIAL ARCHAOLOGY OF SCOTLAND: THE HIGHLANDS AND ISLANDS, Vol. 2, (1977), p92; T Ruddock, ARCH BRIDGES AND THEIR BUILDERS 1735-1835, (1979), p190-191; A Penfold (ed), THOMAS TELFORD: ENGINEER, (1980), p158, 167, 170; NMRS Plans and Photographs.

About Listed Buildings

Listing is the way that a building or structure of special architectural or historic interest is recognised by law through the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings of special architectural or historic interest using the criteria published in the Historic Environment Scotland Policy Statement.

The statutory listing address is the legal part of the listing. The information in the listed building record gives an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building(s). It is not a definitive historical account or a complete description of the building(s). The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

Listing covers both the exterior and the interior. Listing can cover structures not mentioned which are part of the curtilage of the building, such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. The planning authority is responsible for advising on what is covered by the listing including the curtilage of a listed building. For information about curtilage see www.historicenvironment.scot. Since 1 October 2015 we have been able to exclude items from a listing. If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the Historic Environment Scotland Act 2014. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect current legislation.

If you want to alter, extend or demolish a listed building you need to contact your planning authority to see if you need listed building consent. The planning authority is the main point of contact for all applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot. You can contact us on 0131 668 8716 or at designations@hes.scot.

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