Listed Building

The only legal part of the listing under the Planning (Listing Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 is the address/name of site. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing – see 'About Listed Buildings' below for more information. The further details below the 'Address/Name of Site' are provided for information purposes only.

Address/Name of Site

102 Warrender Park Road (former Usher Institute), including boundary walls and gatepiers, EdinburghLB30644

Status: Designated

Documents

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Summary

Category
B
Date Added
19/03/1993
Last Date Amended
11/08/2016
Local Authority
Edinburgh
Planning Authority
Edinburgh
Burgh
Edinburgh
NGR
NT 25238 72307
Coordinates
325238, 672307

Description

Leadbetter and Fairley, 1899-1902. Usher Institute of Public Health, now converted for residential use (2015), in Renaissance palazzo style with Beaux Arts detailing. 3-storey; recessed central block with pavilion wings. Base course; cill courses at 1st and 2nd floors; deep bracketted eaves cornice; banded ground floor; keystoned segmental-arched windows to ground floor of pavilions; lugged architraved surrounds to 2nd floor windows.

The Warrender Park Road elevation to the north is 6 bays, with the central block recessed. Advanced central doorcase with banded Ionic columns, entablature and 3 heraldic shields set in frieze; architraved and lugged splayed doorway with keystone; original bell-pull; modern tripartite door; advanced single windows in 2 bays above; semi-circular pediment breaking eaves over heraldic carving; stone obelisk finial; single windows in 2 bays flanking to left and right; balustraded parapet above eaves. Pavilion wing to outer left; 4-bay at ground with central windows advanced; giant Ionic pilasters flanking central 3 bays at 1st and 2nd floors; Gibbsian windows at 2nd floor; broken pediment above; single windows in bays to outer left and right. Pavilion wing to outer right; 4-bay at ground floor with central windows advanced; giant Ionic pilasters flanking 2 round-arched keystoned windows with fanlight glazing patterns at 1st floor and 3 Gibbsian windows at 2nd floor; broken pediment above; small single windows in bays to outer left and right.

The east elevation to Spottiswoode Street has 3 segmental-arched and keystoned windows at ground; 5 single windows at 1st and 2nd floors; those in 2nd and 4th bays at 3rd floor taller and segmental-arched with Gibbsian surrounds. The west elevation has tripartite and small single windows at ground; oeil-de-beouf windows flanking 2 round-arched keystoned windows with fanlight glazing patterns at 1st floor. 3 segmental-arched Gibbsian windows at 2nd floor.

Plate glass in timber sash and case windows with 2-pane lower sashes. Red pantiled roof; rainwater goods, including hoppers.

The interior was seen in 2015. The entrance hall has terrazzo tiling to the floor, is lined with oak timber panelling with 6-panel timber doors and timber Ionic pilasters at the corners. There is also a dentilled cornice. The stairway is lined with porcelain tiles and its windows have some decorative coloured glass. The majority of the remainder of the building has been converted into student accommodation.

Low coped boundary wall with replacement railings to streets; corniced ashlar gatepiers with quadrant walls to W.

Statement of Special Interest

102 Warrender Park Road is an imposing building with some excellent decorative features, particularly around the windows. Internally, the building has been converted into student accommodation, but the entrance hall retains some good timber decoration.

Edinburgh University was the first university in Britain to have a department of Public Health. In 1898 Sir John Usher of Norton endowed a chair of Public Health at the University of Edinburgh, and promised to build and equip suitable laboratories and classrooms once a professor had been appointed. The resulting building, built on land provided by the University and opened in 1902, was the John Usher Institute of Public Health. Although the Institute was to be administered by the University, Sir John made it clear in his deed of gift that 'the said Institute should be made useful to the Public Health Administration of the City of Edinburgh'. The interior contained various teaching and research rooms, analysis rooms for gas and water, optical and balance rooms, bacteriological and chemical laboratories. There was also a lecture theatre at the west end of the building with seating for 200 students. There was also a flat in the basement for the janitor.

In 1986-8, the Public Health Department moved from the Usher Institute to other premises within the University. The building has been converted into student accommodation.

Thomas Leadbetter and James Fairley was an Edinburgh based practice, working from 1895-1902.

Statutory address and listed building record revised in 2016. Previously listed as '102 Warrender Park Road, Former Usher Institute'.

References

Bibliography

Canmore: http://canmore.org.uk/ CANMORE ID 127151

Ordnance Survey (Surveyed 1906, Published 1908) Edinburghshire Sheet 003.1. 25 Miles to the Inch Map. Southampton: Ordnance Survey.

City of Edinburgh Dean of Guild Plans, Ref: 28/9/1899.

Maclean, U. (1975) The Usher Institute and the Evolution of Community Medicine in Edinburgh. Edinburgh: Department of Community Medicine.

Cant, M. (1984) Marchmont in Edinburgh, Edinburgh: John Donald Publishers Ltd. p. 46-48.

Maclean, U (2004) The History of the Usher Institute in Bhopal, R. & Last, J. (eds) Public Health: past present and future: celebrating academic public health in Edinburgh 1902-2002. Norwich: The Stationary Office. p. 49-69.

Dictionary of Scottish Architects, Leadbetter & Fairley http://www.scottisharchitects.org.uk/architect_full.php?id=200734 (accessed 27/10/2015).

About Listed Buildings

Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating sites and places at the national level. These designations are Scheduled monuments, Listed buildings, Inventory of gardens and designed landscapes and Inventory of historic battlefields.

We make recommendations to the Scottish Government about historic marine protected areas, and the Scottish Ministers decide whether to designate.

Listing is the process that identifies, designates and provides statutory protection for buildings of special architectural or historic interest as set out in the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings which are found to be of special architectural or historic interest using the selection guidance published in Designation Policy and Selection Guidance (2019)

Listed building records provide an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building which has been identified by its statutory address. The description and additional information provided are supplementary and have no legal weight.

These records are not definitive historical accounts or a complete description of the building(s). If part of a building is not described it does not mean it is not listed. The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site which is known as the statutory address. Other than the name or address of a listed building, further details are provided for information purposes only. Historic Environment Scotland does not accept any liability for any loss or damage suffered as a consequence of inaccuracies in the information provided. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing. Even if a number or name is missing from a listing address it will still be listed. Listing covers both the exterior and the interior and any object or structure fixed to the building. Listing also applies to buildings or structures not physically attached but which are part of the curtilage (or land) of the listed building as long as they were erected before 1 July 1948.

While Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating listed buildings, the planning authority is responsible for determining what is covered by the listing, including what is listed through curtilage. However, for listed buildings designated or for listings amended from 1 October 2015, legal exclusions to the listing may apply.

If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the 1997 Act. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect subsequent legislation.

Listed building consent is required for changes to a listed building which affect its character as a building of special architectural or historic interest. The relevant planning authority is the point of contact for applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot/advice-and-support. You can contact us on 0131 668 8914 or at designations@hes.scot.

Images

102 Warrender Park Road, front elevation with cars in foreground

Map

Map of 102 Warrender Park Road (Former Usher Institute), Including Boundary Walls And Gatepiers, Edinburgh

Printed: 16/01/2021 00:28