Listed Building

The only legal part of the listing under the Planning (Listing Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997 is the address/name of site. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing – see 'About Listed Buildings' below for more information. The further details below the 'Address/Name of Site' are provided for information purposes only.

Address/Name of Site

HOLYROOD ROAD AND QUEEN'S DRIVE, HOLYROOD LODGELB28023

Status: Designated

Documents

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Summary

Category
B
Date Added
11/01/1989
Local Authority
Edinburgh
Planning Authority
Edinburgh
Burgh
Edinburgh
NGR
NT 26846 73811
Coordinates
326846, 673811

Description

Robert Matheson, dated 1857. Single storey and attic, irregular plan, gabled former lodge with decorative curvilinear bargeboarding and diamond flues (currently visitors centre, 2007). Droved, snecked ashlar. Base course. Tripartite and bipartite windows with timber mullions. Entrance elevation to N with off-centre, projecting, gabled entrance porch with Tudor-arched door surround and boarded timber entrance door to E face. Timber finials to gables. Date plaque to S inscribed VR 1857.

Predominantly 2-pane timber casement windows. Graded grey slates. Central ridge stack with corniced diamond flues.

INTERIOR: (partially seen 2007). Comprehensively modernised.

Statement of Special Interest

The diamond flues and decorative bargeboarding of this lodge add significantly to the character of Holyrood Park. Positioned at the Holyrood Palace entrance, it is the earliest of the purpose-built lodges to the Park and they all share a similar distinctive gabled, picturesque style. Prince Albert instigated the landscaping of the Park from 1855-8 and four Lodges positioned around the Queen's Drive clearly demarcate the distinct parkland area of Holyrood Park from the surrounding city. The other lodges are Meadowbank, Duddingston and St Leonard's Lodges (see separate listings). The Lodges were designed by Robert Matheson, the Clerk of Works for Scotland, who carried out a programme of gradual improvements to the Palace, the Park and the Abbey Precincts at the request of Queen Victoria. These improvements included designing the Lodges for the entrances to the Park and the fountain in the forecourt of the Palace.

The grounds known as Holyrood Park had been associated with the Scottish royal household since the 12th century, and were extended to roughly their present boundaries in 1541-2 by James V. The rights of the Earl of Haddington as hereditary keeper of the Park were bought out in 1843, after Queen Victoria's first visit to the Palace in 1842, bringing it again under Royal control. In 1855-8, at the instigation of Prince Albert, plans were drawn up for the landscaping of the Park. Bogs were drained, Dunsapie and St Margaret's Lochs were formed, the Queen's Drive (originally Victoria Road) was constructed, and lodges built by Robert Matheson, who also executed work at Holyrood Palace during the same period. Albert also intended to build a rustic thatched restaurant at Dunsapie Loch, but this plan was abandoned in the face of stout public opposition. With the exception of the occupied buildings, including the lodges, the Park is scheduled under the Ancient Monuments and Archaeological Areas Act 1979.

It should be recognised that significant below-ground archaeological remains may survive here as part of and in addition to the structures and features described above.

List description revised as part of the Edinburgh Holyrood Ward resurvey 2007-08.

References

Bibliography

2nd Edition Ordnance Survey Map (1876-7). John Gifford, Colin McWilliam and David Walker, The Buildings of Scotland, Edinburgh, 1984. p12, 147. C R Wickam-Jones, Arthur's Seat and Holyrood Park, 1996. Other information courtesy of local residents.

Historic Environment Scotland Properties

Holyrood Park

https://www.historicenvironment.scot/visit-a-place/places/holyrood-park

Find out more

Related Designations

  1. HOLYROOD PARK, WELLS O' WEARIE COTTAGELB49515

    Designation Type
    Listed Building (C)
    Status
    Designated
  2. HOLYROOD PARK, ST LEONARD'S FOUNTAINLB49514

    Designation Type
    Listed Building (C)
    Status
    Designated
  3. 23 AND 23A HOLYROOD PARK, ST LEONDARD'S LODGELB49512

    Designation Type
    Listed Building (C)
    Status
    Designated
  4. HOLYROOD PARK, DUDDINGSTON (SOUTH) LODGE, 32, OLD CHURCH LANELB49511

    Designation Type
    Listed Building (B)
    Status
    Designated
  5. HOLYROOD PARK, MEADOWBANK LODGELB49513

    Designation Type
    Listed Building (C)
    Status
    Designated
  6. HOLYROOD PARK, DUMBIEDYKES LODGELB49510

    Designation Type
    Listed Building (C)
    Status
    Designated
  7. PALACE OF HOLYROODHOUSEGDL00308

    Designation Type
    Garden & Designed Landscape
    Status
    Designated
  8. PRESTONFIELD HOUSE (PRIESTFIELD)GDL00319

    Designation Type
    Garden & Designed Landscape
    Status
    Designated
  9. Holyrood ParkSM13032

    Designation Type
    Scheduled Monument
    Status
    Designated
  10. QUEEN'S DRIVE, ST MARGARET'S WELLLB27909

    Designation Type
    Listed Building (B)
    Status
    Removed

About Listed Buildings

Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating sites and places at the national level. These designations are Scheduled monuments, Listed buildings, Inventory of gardens and designed landscapes and Inventory of historic battlefields.

We make recommendations to the Scottish Government about historic marine protected areas, and the Scottish Ministers decide whether to designate.

Listing is the process that identifies, designates and provides statutory protection for buildings of special architectural or historic interest as set out in the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings which are found to be of special architectural or historic interest using the selection guidance published in Designation Policy and Selection Guidance (2019)

Listed building records provide an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building which has been identified by its statutory address. The description and additional information provided are supplementary and have no legal weight.

These records are not definitive historical accounts or a complete description of the building(s). If part of a building is not described it does not mean it is not listed. The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site which is known as the statutory address. Other than the name or address of a listed building, further details are provided for information purposes only. Historic Environment Scotland does not accept any liability for any loss or damage suffered as a consequence of inaccuracies in the information provided. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing. Even if a number or name is missing from a listing address it will still be listed. Listing covers both the exterior and the interior and any object or structure fixed to the building. Listing also applies to buildings or structures not physically attached but which are part of the curtilage (or land) of the listed building as long as they were erected before 1 July 1948.

While Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating listed buildings, the planning authority is responsible for determining what is covered by the listing, including what is listed through curtilage. However, for listed buildings designated or for listings amended from 1 October 2015, legal exclusions to the listing may apply.

If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the 1997 Act. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect subsequent legislation.

Listed building consent is required for changes to a listed building which affect its character as a building of special architectural or historic interest. The relevant planning authority is the point of contact for applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot/advice-and-support. You can contact us on 0131 668 8914 or at designations@hes.scot.

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Printed: 01/12/2022 15:44