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Listed Building

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site only. All other information in the record is not statutory.

WESTERTON, 41-49 (ODD NOS) MAXWELL AVENUELB22152

Status: Designated

Documents

There are no additional online documents for this record.

Summary

Information

  • Category: C
  • Date Added: 30/06/1988

Location

  • Local Authority: East Dunbartonshire
  • Planning Authority: East Dunbartonshire
  • Burgh: Bearsden

National Grid Reference

  • NGR: NS 54053 70762
  • Coordinates: 254053, 670762

Description

J A W Grant with Raymond Unwin as consultant. Built 1913/15. English Arts and Crafts. 5-house block in symmetrical arrangement; single storey and attic, advanced centre gable with flat-canopied door to right; main roof deep-eaved and timber-bracketted on either side; tripartite windows, the outer set in shallow projecting bays, still below eaves. Harled; small-paned upper sashes at ground; flat-roofed

dormer; stacks set below apex; red-tile roofs.

Statement of Special Interest

Westerton is of interest because it's a rare example in Scotland of a pre-Housing Act garden suburb on the English 'ideal village' model, and where the village was organised on a co-ownership basis. J A W Grant was architect, but Raymond Unwin, pioneer in housing design, acted as consultant and his influence on the scheme was significant, most obviously in the very English detailing.

In 1911 the Glasgow Garden suburb tenant's society was formed to promote the principles realised at Westerton. The foundation stone was laid on 19 April 1912 and by 1915, 84 houses (all but, roughly, 2) were in occupation. The buildings have survived in a little-altered condition, with most original doors and glazing retained.

About Designations

Listed Buildings

Listing is the way that a building or structure of special architectural or historic interest is recognised by law through the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings of special architectural or historic interest using the criteria published in the Historic Environment Scotland Policy Statement.

The statutory listing address is the legal part of the listing. The information in the listed building record gives an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building(s). It is not a definitive historical account or a complete description of the building(s). The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

Listing covers both the exterior and the interior. Listing can cover structures not mentioned which are part of the curtilage of the building, such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. The planning authority is responsible for advising on what is covered by the listing including the curtilage of a listed building. For information about curtilage see www.historicenvironment.scot. Since 1 October 2015 we have been able to exclude items from a listing. If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the Historic Environment Scotland Act 2014. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect current legislation.

If you want to alter, extend or demolish a listed building you need to contact your planning authority to see if you need listed building consent. The planning authority is the main point of contact for all applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot. You can contact us on 0131 668 8716 or at designations@hes.scot.

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Printed: 28/09/2016 23:13