Listed Building

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site only. All other information in the record is not statutory.

ASCOG, ASCOG CHURCH INCLUDING BOUNDARY WALL AND PIERSLB12060

Status: Designated

Documents

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Summary

Category
B
Date Added
20/07/1971
Local Authority
Argyll And Bute
Planning Authority
Argyll And Bute
Parish
Kingarth
NGR
NS 10787 63330
Coordinates
210787, 663330

Description

James Hamilton, 1842-43. Near-symmetrical, rectangular-plan single bay former United Free church with single storey porch projecting to front (lean-to addition adjoined to right); 3-stage Italianate belfry centred at rear (corniced and recessed at each stage). Whitewashed harl; yellow sandstone dressings. Raised base course; eaves course beneath overhanging timber bracketed eaves. Strip quoins; architraved surrounds to openings (predominantly round-arched); chamfered reveals; stone mullions to bipartites. Polished quoins to belfry at ground; shouldered margins at 2nd stage; square-headed margins above.

SW (FRONT) ELEVATION: blind Venetian window centred in apex above piended porch comprising square-headed single window beneath gabled eaves; surmounting pedimented arch; flanking stylised consoles.

NW (SIDE) ELEVATION: 4 regularly-spaced round-arched windows to main hall; single timber door (entrance) set in recessed porch to outer right; recessed belfry to outer left comprising 2-leaf timber door at ground; round-arched surround; blind 2nd stage; louvred bipartite opening beneath overhanging eaves at 3rd stage.

SE (SIDE) ELEVATION: 4 regularly-spaced round-arched windows to main hall; boarded timber doors in lean-to addition to outer left; recessed belfry to outer right as above.

NE (REAR) ELEVATION: projecting belfry at centre comprising narrow square-headed window at ground; narrow round-arched window at 2nd stage; louvred bipartite opening centred beneath overhanging eaves at 3rd stage. Blind, round-arched openings recessed at ground in bays to outer left and right.

Predominantly small-paned stained glazing to main hall (some decorative stained glass); timber-mullioned glazing to remaining openings. Graded grey slate shallow-pitched roof to main hall; graded grey slate piended porch; shallow-pitched piend surmounting belfry (finial missing). Replacement rainwater goods; corniced apex stack to SW; cans missing.

INTERIOR: boarded timber dado; timber pews; corniced timber door-surrounds. Carved octagonal baptismal font; round-arched pilastered screen behind timber panelled pulpit to SW; flanking timber panelled doors. Single door centred at rear (NE); balustraded, round-arched blind opening aligned above. Decorative ceiling with architraved groins forming symmetrical, geometric pattern; painted bosses; regularly-spaced armorial shields set in cornice; replacement light fittings.

BOUNDARY WALL AND PIERS: coped low wall enclosing site to SW; stop-chamfered, painted square-plan piers flanking vehicular entrance; pyramidal caps.

Statement of Special Interest

Ecclesiastical building in use as such. A simple but nevertheless, dignified church with some interesting features - shallow-pitched gables, an Italianate belfry recessing with each of its 3 stages, a blind Venetian window and relatively intact interior. Opened for public worship on Sunday 9th June 1843, it became the first new permanent church building of the Free Church of Scotland. Wilson quotes a visitor?s first impressions - "...on a point of rock jutting out into the water, a kirk has been erected in connection with the Church of Scotland. The spot is exceedingly picturesque; and the church, destitute of everything like ornament, is rendered interesting to the stranger from the dignified solitude of its situation" (p90). Although some have cited David Hamilton as architect, the fact that he was incapacitated by illness and indeed, died in 1843, makes it far more likely that his son, James, was responsible for the design and building of the church.

References

Bibliography

WILSON'S GUIDE TO ROTHESAY AND THE ISLAND OF BUTE (1848) p90; appears on Ordnance Survey map, 1863; J MacCallum "WISH YOU WERE HERE": A PICTURE POSTCARD VIEW OF EDWARDIAN BUTE p25; F Walker & F Sinclair NORTH CLYDE ESTUARY: AN ILLUSTRATED ARCHITECTURAL GUIDE (1992) p155; DAVID HAMILTON, ARCHITECT 1768-1843 ed. A MacKechnie (1993); H Colvin A BIOGRAPHICAL DICTIONARY OF BRITISH ARCHITECTS 1600 - 1840 (1995) p449-451; THE DAVID HAMILTON COLLECTION (1995), Mitchell Library.

About Listed Buildings

Listing is the way that a building or structure of special architectural or historic interest is recognised by law through the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings of special architectural or historic interest using the criteria published in the Historic Environment Scotland Policy Statement.

The statutory listing address is the legal part of the listing. The information in the listed building record gives an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building(s). It is not a definitive historical account or a complete description of the building(s). The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

Listing covers both the exterior and the interior. Listing can cover structures not mentioned which are part of the curtilage of the building, such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. The planning authority is responsible for advising on what is covered by the listing including the curtilage of a listed building. For information about curtilage see www.historicenvironment.scot. Since 1 October 2015 we have been able to exclude items from a listing. If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the Historic Environment Scotland Act 2014. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect current legislation.

If you want to alter, extend or demolish a listed building you need to contact your planning authority to see if you need listed building consent. The planning authority is the main point of contact for all applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot. You can contact us on 0131 668 8716 or at designations@hes.scot.

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Printed: 14/11/2018 03:22