Listed Building

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site only. All other information in the record is not statutory.

1 KERRYCROY VILLAGE INCLUDING BOUNDARY WALLSLB12057

Status: Designated

Documents

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Summary

Category
B
Date Added
20/07/1971
Local Authority
Argyll And Bute
Planning Authority
Argyll And Bute
Parish
Kingarth
NGR
NS 10665 61450
Coordinates
210665, 661450

Description

Early 19th century. Pair of single storey, 3-bay Tudor Gothic cottages forming symmetrical 6-bay block; converted to single residence late 20th century. Whitewashed harl; painted, slightly projecting cills; hoodmoulds surmounting bipartite openings; stone mullions. Boarded timber porches centred at ground; piended additions at rear.

E (ENTRANCE) ELEVATION: boarded timber doors facing S and N respectively set in pitched-roofed porches in penultimate bays to outer left and right; flanking single windows.

12-pane timber casements. Graded grey slate roof; replacement rainwater goods; coped ridge and apex stacks; circular terracotta cans.

INTERIOR: not seen 1996.

BOUNDARY WALLS: flanking rubble-coped, harl-pointed random rubble walls; timber pedestrian entrance gates.

Statement of Special Interest

B group with Nos 3 & 4, 5 & 6, 7 & 8, 10, 11 & 12 and 13 & 14 Kerrycroy village (see separate list entries). One of four identical single storey cottages built to the liking of the wife of the 2nd Marquess of Bute, previously Lady Guildford, from 1803. Aiming to remodel the small community clustered at their gates, the Marquess and his wife also provided an inn - placing it at the centre of the open crescent, with views towards the sea. Inspired by the idea of an English hamlet, subsequent development resulted in the building of 2 half-timbered Old English style houses complete with red tile roofs and gabled dormers. Although an obvious contrast with the nearby single storey cottages and relatively stark inn, care was taken to respect the original layout, thereby enhancing the image of a community clustered around a village green. The addition of a maypole increased the sense of Englishness. By 1907, Kerrycroy was capable of supporting a school (the former inn), a post-office, tea-room and grocer?s shop. Today, some of the single storey cottages have been converted into single residences, the school has been subdivided to form 2 flats and the post office and grocer's shop have gone. However, conversions have been sympathetic and the basic form remains.

References

Bibliography

Appears on Ordnance Survey map, 1863; I Munro THE ISLAND OF BUTE (1973) p138; J MacCallum "WISH YOU WERE HERE": A PICTURE POSTCARD VIEW OF EDWARDIAN BUTE p26-27; AN INVENTORY OF GARDENS AND DESIGNED LANDSCAPES IN SCOTLAND Vol2 p329; F Walker & F Sinclair NORTH CLYDE ESTUARY: AN ILLUSTRATED ARCHITECTURAL GUIDE (1992) p165.

About Listed Buildings

Listing is the way that a building or structure of special architectural or historic interest is recognised by law through the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings of special architectural or historic interest using the criteria published in the Historic Environment Scotland Policy Statement.

The statutory listing address is the legal part of the listing. The information in the listed building record gives an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building(s). It is not a definitive historical account or a complete description of the building(s). The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

Listing covers both the exterior and the interior. Listing can cover structures not mentioned which are part of the curtilage of the building, such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. The planning authority is responsible for advising on what is covered by the listing including the curtilage of a listed building. For information about curtilage see www.historicenvironment.scot. Since 1 October 2015 we have been able to exclude items from a listing. If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the Historic Environment Scotland Act 2014. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect current legislation.

If you want to alter, extend or demolish a listed building you need to contact your planning authority to see if you need listed building consent. The planning authority is the main point of contact for all applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot. You can contact us on 0131 668 8716 or at designations@hes.scot.

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Printed: 21/11/2018 08:09