Listed Building

The only legal part of the listing is the address/name of site. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing – see ‘About Listed Buildings’ below for more information.

MARKET PLACE, TOWN HOUSE, OLD SHERIFF COURT AND BOUNDARY WALLSLB40569

Status: Designated

Documents

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Summary

Category
A
Date Added
12/03/1971
Supplementary Information Updated
11/12/1996
Local Authority
Scottish Borders
Planning Authority
Scottish Borders
Burgh
Selkirk
NGR
NT 47026 28477
Coordinates
347026, 628477

Description

1803-4 with later additions and alterations. 2-storey, 3-bay classical building with projections to rear and prominent steeple; sited on ground rising to SE. Polished ashlar at ground; cherry-corked whinstone at 1st floor with polished ashlar (now render-repaired) dressings; whinstone rubble with polished ashlar (now render-repaired) dressings to rear and to SW elevation. Base course; band course between ground and 1st floor; eaves course; long and short flush quoins and tails to window margins; moulded band course defining each stage of tower.

NW (MARKET PLACE) ELEVATION: bay to centre slightly advanced. Rendered at ground with 2-leaf boarded door in round-arched doorway; commemorative bronze plaques flanking (see Notes); round-arched opening at 1st floor above with square-headed window inset with stained glass window utilising Selkirk Coat of Arms (see Notes). TOWER AND SPIRE: square-plan; 110ft to its weathercock. Rectangular plaque at 1st stage; round-faced clock to each face, at 2nd stage; octagonal-planned 3rd stage, bell-chamber, with round-arched openings to each face, blinded except louvred above each clock. Octagonal stone spire with

3 tiers of oval lucarnes (some open, some blinded) to each face. Weathervane surmounting 2 balls, without compass points. Flanking bays mirrored with projecting shop front at ground; 2-leaf panelled door (deep-set glazed inner door); fixed-pane window to outer; window at 1st floor above.

SE ELEVATION: tall window to centre. 2-storey projection in bay to left with steps to modern panelled door to right of gabled SE elevation. Single storey addition in bay to right with door to SE.

12-pane timber sash and case windows. Slate piended roof.

INTERIOR: COURTROOM: (see Notes) principal room reached by steps from main (Market Place) entrance; timber glazed vestibule partition at top of steps; cove-edged ceiling with cast-iron vents; panelled clerks compound and boarded raised sheriff?s precinct; panelled dado.

BOUNDARY WALLS: coped whinstone rubble to SE.

Statement of Special Interest

It was written in 1817, that over the last 11-12 years, Selkirk had been improved greatly and that a new Town House had been built, "containing apartments for Town and Sheriff Court and a library adorned with a handsome spire 100ft high..." (Gilbert P121). The building work commenced in 1803 and was completed in 1804. There was a refurbishment in 1835 costing ?227. The Sheriff Court moved out in the 1870s. Improvements were made to the access of the building in 1891, when the stained glass was included in the window above the main entrance. The building has in recent years been converted into a museum and much of the interior of the courtroom has been re-presented with replica furnishings. The plaque to the left of the door to centre is to commemorate the Charter by King James V to the burgers and community of the Royal burgh of Selkirk on 4th March 1535, renewing earlier charters. It was unveiled by the Earl of Home on 14th June 1935. The plaque to the right of the door is to commemorate Sir Walter Scott?s position as sheriff of Selkirk between 1803 and 1832. He had in fact been serving thus since 1799. It is due to this historical link with Sir Walter Scott and also the building?s importance in the Market Place, with its imposing and fine steeple, that it has been listed at category A.

References

Bibliography

J M Gilbert (ed) FLOWER OF THE FOREST - SELKIRK: A NEW HISTORY (1985). C A Strang BORDERS AND BERWICK (1994). AN INVENTORY OF THE ANCIENT AND HISTORICAL MONUMENTS OF SELKIRKSHIRE WITH THE 15TH REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONS, The Royal Commission on the Ancient Monuments of Scotland (1957), P47. T Craig-Brown THE HISTORY OF SELKIRKSHIRE (1886), Vol 1, p578.

About Listed Buildings

Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating sites and places at the national level. These designations are Scheduled monuments, Listed buildings, Inventory of gardens and designed landscapes and Inventory of historic battlefields.

We make recommendations to the Scottish Government about historic marine protected areas, and the Scottish Ministers decide whether to designate.

Listing is the process that identifies, designates and provides statutory protection for buildings of special architectural or historic interest as set out in the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings which are found to be of special architectural or historic interest using the selection guidance published in Designation Policy and Selection Guidance (2019)

Listed building records provide an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building which has been identified by its statutory address. The description and additional information provided are supplementary and have no legal weight.

These records are not definitive historical accounts or a complete description of the building(s). If part of a building is not described it does not mean it is not listed. The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site which is known as the statutory address. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing. Even if a number or name is missing from a listing address it will still be listed. Listing covers both the exterior and the interior and any object or structure fixed to the building. Listing also applies to buildings or structures not physically attached but which are part of the curtilage (or land) of the listed building as long as they were erected before 1 July 1948.

While Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for designating listed buildings, the planning authority is responsible for determining what is covered by the listing, including what is listed through curtilage. However, for listed buildings designated or for listings amended from 1 October 2015, legal exclusions to the listing may apply.

If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the 1997 Act. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect subsequent legislation.

Listed building consent is required for changes to a listed building which affect its character as a building of special architectural or historic interest. The relevant planning authority is the point of contact for applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot/advice-and-support. You can contact us on 0131 668 8914 or at designations@hes.scot.

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Printed: 21/05/2019 14:29