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Listed Building

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site only. All other information in the record is not statutory.

CROMLIX HOUSE, SUNDIAL AND FLANKING PAIR OF GATEPIERS (FORMERLY FIREPLACE JAMBS)LB3997

Status: Designated

Documents

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Summary

Information

  • Category: A
  • Date Added: 05/10/1971

Location

  • Local Authority: Stirling
  • Planning Authority: Stirling
  • Parish: Dunblane And Lecropt

National Grid Reference

  • NGR: NN 78198 6026
  • Coordinates: 278198, 706026

Description

Sundial 17th century with flanking 16th century pair of gatepiers (formerly fireplace jambs). Grouped to S of Cromlix House (see separate listing).

SUNDIAL: obelisk sundial. Shallow octagonal base surmounted by square column, divided on each side to form 5 compartments. Wider chamfered octagonal capital above with canted facets above and below. Tall obelisk above. Grey sandstone ashlar. Geometric, heart-shaped, and circular sinkings set in column compartments. Hollowed-out dials to 4 facets of capital.

GATEPIERS: 16th century. Identical. Shaft with central engaged column with deeply moulded base and large, overhanging polygonal capital. Pink sandstone. Horizontal banding to capital with incised rosette pattern; similar rosette pattern to shaft. Surmounted by splayed grey sandstone copes and ball finials to form gatepiers.

Statement of Special Interest

The sundial is a fine and well preserved example of an obelisk type sundial - a type unique to Scotland and dating from the seventeenth century. Only a handful of this type of sundial is thought to exist. The different shaped incised sinkings use the edge of each figure to cast a shadow and similar shadows are cast by the hollowed-out dials and triangular shapes on the capital. The obelisk, in contrast, is smooth. Local knowledge suggests that the sundial was found at Innerpeffrey Castle, which was owned by the Drummonds until early in the twentieth century, and it may have stood in Lady Madderty's garden. Similar sundials can be found at Drummond Castle and Mount Stuart (see separate listings) among other locations.

The firejambs are likely to date from the 16th century and appear to have been subsequently converted to form gatepiers. They were originally situated in Lord Strathallan's House in Dunblane, known as Strathallan's Lodging. The house fell into disrepair early in the 19th century. They now flank the later, 17th century sundial. It is not known when the sundial and firejambs were moved to their present location, although family photographs show them in their present site at the end of the 19th century.

The sundial and the gatepiers were previously listed separately. Listing merged in 2006.

References

Bibliography

Macgibbon and Ross, Castellated and Domestic Architecture of Scotland Vol V (1887-92) p407. Christopher St J.H. Daniel, Sundials (2004) p.34. John Gifford and Frank Arneil Walker, The Buildings of Scotland Stirling and Central Scotland, (2002) p354. RCAHMS Ref no NN70NE 2.01. Other information courtesy of local residents.

About Designations

Listed Buildings

Listing is the way that a building or structure of special architectural or historic interest is recognised by law through the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings of special architectural or historic interest using the criteria published in the Historic Environment Scotland Policy Statement.

The statutory listing address is the legal part of the listing. The information in the listed building record gives an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building(s). It is not a definitive historical account or a complete description of the building(s). The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

Listing covers both the exterior and the interior. Listing can cover structures not mentioned which are part of the curtilage of the building, such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. The planning authority is responsible for advising on what is covered by the listing including the curtilage of a listed building. For information about curtilage see www.historicenvironment.scot. Since 1 October 2015 we have been able to exclude items from a listing. If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the Historic Environment Scotland Act 2014. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect current legislation.

If you want to alter, extend or demolish a listed building you need to contact your planning authority to see if you need listed building consent. The planning authority is the main point of contact for all applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot. You can contact us on 0131 668 8716 or at designations@hes.scot.

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Printed: 29/09/2016 05:59