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Listed Building

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site only. All other information in the record is not statutory.


Status: Designated


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  • Category: A
  • Date Added: 03/08/1971
  • Supplementary Information Updated: 06/01/2016


  • Local Authority: Dumfries And Galloway
  • Planning Authority: Dumfries And Galloway
  • Burgh: Lochmaben

National Grid Reference

  • NGR: NY 8365 82268
  • Coordinates: 308365, 582268


Style of Walter Newall, architect. Built 1819-20. Rectangular-plan 4-bay Gothic church at south end of High Street; north gable, with central 3-stage square tower, faces Town House. Tower, principal north elevation and dressings, containing 14th century bells (see Statement of Special Interest below). All red ashlar, remainder rubble built, Hood-moulded pointed openings throughout, small-paned glazing with woodentracery, cusped and latticed at north. Rendered 1959 lean-to vestry at south with lancets.

Tower door in re-entrant angle, original vestry in inner stage, top stage has louvred belfry openings; pierced parapet links spiked pinnacles over angles; similarpinnacles above shallow angle buttresses at north; south gable crowstepped. Slate roof.

INTERIOR: cusped Gothic pulpit, organ and communion table at north end and ground level seating, all replacements (perhaps by Frank Carruthers, circa 1880); unusually complete and deep horseshoe gallery is original and is supported on timber columns (2 tiers at south), named and numbered gated pews with timber snecks. Ribbed flat ceiling.

Enclosed by rubble-built and ashlar-coped low boundary walls; corniced piers at north.

Statement of Special Interest

Place of worship in use as such. The two bells which hang in the tower are named the Bruce Bell and the Pope Bell and may date from the early to mid-14th century. The inscription on the [Bruce] bell, in Lombardic Capitals, and the letters composing it are reversed so as to read from right to left + JOHANNES ADAM ME FECIT + (John Adama made me) while on the sound bow in paired letters is the Angelic Salutation and Dedication - AVE MARIA. see the Royal Burgh of Lochmaben pp.9 and 10 for further information on the church bells. The labelled gallery pew doors are particularly rare.Category was changed from B to A on 04.10.1988. Listed building record updated 2016.



Canmore: CANMORE ID 66312

Ordnace Survey (surveyed1856, published 1861) Dumfries Sheet L.3 (Lochmaben). 25 inches to the mile. 1st Edition. London: Ordnance Survey.

2 seating plans in vestry; one dated 14.7.1820, the other, by Carruthers, dated 16.6.188( ).

Groome, F.H. (1885) Ordnance Gazetteer of Scotland (2nd ed) Vol IV p539.

Wilson, J. (2001) The Kirk Bells and the Grave Slab in Wilson J.B. The Royal Burgh of Lochmaben: Its History, Its Castle and Its Churches. 2nd Edition. pp.9-10.

About Designations

Listed Buildings

Listing is the way that a building or structure of special architectural or historic interest is recognised by law through the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings of special architectural or historic interest using the criteria published in the Historic Environment Scotland Policy Statement.

The statutory listing address is the legal part of the listing. The information in the listed building record gives an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building(s). It is not a definitive historical account or a complete description of the building(s). The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

Listing covers both the exterior and the interior. Listing can cover structures not mentioned which are part of the curtilage of the building, such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. The planning authority is responsible for advising on what is covered by the listing including the curtilage of a listed building. For information about curtilage see Since 1 October 2015 we have been able to exclude items from a listing. If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the Historic Environment Scotland Act 2014. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect current legislation.

If you want to alter, extend or demolish a listed building you need to contact your planning authority to see if you need listed building consent. The planning authority is the main point of contact for all applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at You can contact us on 0131 668 8716 or at


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Printed: 22/10/2016 08:02