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Listed Building

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site only. All other information in the record is not statutory.

70 CATHEDRAL SQUARE, GLASGOW CATHEDRAL AND CATHEDRAL GRAVEYARD, BOUNDARY WALLS AND RAILINGSLB32654

Status: Designated

Documents

There are no additional online documents for this record.

Summary

Information

  • Category: A
  • Date Added: 15/12/1970

Location

  • Local Authority: Glasgow
  • Planning Authority: Glasgow
  • Burgh: Glasgow

National Grid Reference

  • NGR: NS 60248 65577
  • Coordinates: 260248, 665577

Description

The building history of this great cathedral is long and

complex with at least 4 or 5 campaigns of building from

the early 12th century to the early 14th century by which

time the main body of the cathedral was complete. The

spire and Blackadder aisle were not completed in their

present form before the 15th century. A new cathedral

to serve the diocese of Glasgow was begun circa 1118 and

=consecrated in 1136. A further series of building works took

place in 1180's prior to its second consecration in

1197. Fragments of this early building survive in the SE

part of the crypt.

The major campaigns of building for the present cathedral

began around 1200, but by 1240 a new and grander

layout was adopted and work on the crypt and choir

begun. Also at this time work started on the Blackadder

aisle, only to be abandoned until completion by

Archbishop Blackadder between 1483 and 1508. The last

decades of the 13th century saw building work restart on

the nave, the choir being complete by that date. In the

early years of the 15th century a serious fire damaged

the chapter house necessitating extensive repairs, and

destroyed the original timber spire. This was rebuilt in

stone by the mid 15th-century.

Though surviving the Reformation in a virtually intact

state, despite internal subdivision to form 3 parish

churches, the cathedral suffered its worst alteration in

the 19th century. The 2 symmetrical towers flanking the

W end were demolished 1846-8, and the great W window

(first opened by David Hamilton in 1812) recast by

Edward Blore. By the mid 19th century the interior was

returned to its unified state with many new fittings,

completing work begun in the choir by William Stark in

1805.

INTERIOR: Many very high quality monuments and tombs

survive.

STAINED GLASS: between 1936 and 1967 the whole nave and

choir were fitted out with stained glass windows by

Scottish and British artists replacing the

mid-19th century glass designed by the Royal Bavarian

Stained Glass Company; only a few small lights from this

scheme survive in the sacristy and SW porch.

A full description of the building history of the cathedral

is found in the Official HMSO Guidebook.

BOUNDARY WALLS AND GRAVEYARD: Many good tombs and

monuments dating from the 17th century, some set into

boundary walls. Cast-iron spearhead railings and coped

walls define boundaries to graveyard.

Statement of Special Interest

Ecclesiastical Building in use as such. Guardianship

Monument. The cathedral is dedicated to St Kentigern or

Mungo, his tomb is in the crypt.

Scheduled Monument - SAM 90150.

Re-scheduled area 20 November 2002.

References

Bibliography

Richard Fawcett GLASGOW CATHEDRAL, HMSO 1985. Graham Forsyth

GLASGOW CATHEDRAL STAINED GLASS, 1987. Gomme and Walker,

1987 p15-39. R Fawcett, THE BLACKADDER AISLE AT GLASGOW

CATHEDRAL, PSAS, 115, 1985, p177-289. ed G E Todd, THE BOOK

OF GLASGOW CATHEDRAL, 1898.

About Designations

Listed Buildings

Historic Environment Scotland is responsible for the designation of buildings, monuments, gardens and designed landscapes and historic battlefields. We also advise Scottish Ministers on the designation of historic marine protected areas.

Listing is the way that a building or structure of special architectural or historic interest is recognised by law through the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings of special architectural or historic interest using the criteria published in the Historic Environment Scotland Policy Statement.

The statutory listing address is the legal part of the listing. The information in the listed building record gives an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building(s). It is not a definitive historical account or a complete description of the building(s). The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

Listing covers both the exterior and the interior. Listing can cover structures not mentioned which are part of the curtilage of the building, such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. The planning authority is responsible for advising on what is covered by the listing including the curtilage of a listed building. For information about curtilage see www.historicenvironment.scot. Since 1 October 2015 we have been able to exclude items from a listing. If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the Historic Environment Scotland Act 2014. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect current legislation.

If you want to alter, extend or demolish a listed building you need to contact your planning authority to see if you need listed building consent. The planning authority is the main point of contact for all applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot. You can contact us on 0131 668 8716 or at designations@hes.scot.

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Printed: 26/08/2016 12:55