Skip to content
Print
Listed Building

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site only. All other information in the record is not statutory.

1 BARNS CRESCENT, BARNS HOUSE INCLUDING ANCILLARY STRUCTURES, WALLED GARDEN, GATEPIERS, GATES AND BOUNDARY WALLLB21496

Status: Designated

Documents

There are no additional online documents for this record.

Summary

Information

  • Category: A
  • Date Added: 05/02/1971

Location

  • Local Authority: South Ayrshire
  • Planning Authority: South Ayrshire
  • Burgh: Ayr

National Grid Reference

  • NGR: NS 33591 21569
  • Coordinates: 233591, 621569

Description

17th century to gabled wing; early 19th century main house. 2-storey and attic, 3-bay main house; 2-storey, 3-bay 17th century wing, both rectangular-plan. Painted, droved sandstone (painted rubble to earlier wing) to entrance elevation, exposed to rear elevation. Painted margins to openings.

NW (ENTRANCE) ELEVATION: central Doric pilastered fluted entrance porch; timber door (additional door to re-entrant angle to left); decorative fanlight; mutuled cornice; plaque to block-pediment; single window aligned above at 1st floor; flanking single windows at ground and 1st floor; canted dormers at outer left and right at attic. 2 single windows at ground and 1st floor (non-aligned) to earlier gablehead section to outer right.

SE (REAR) ELEVATION: 5-bay, grouped 3-2. 2 openings to each bay of 3-bay section to left; glazed timber door to left at ground; adjoining loggia to outer left (see walled garden). 2 openings at ground to gablehead earlier section to outer right; single window at 1st floor to re-entrant angle; low single-storey attached rubble-built ancillary structures to NE.

Predominantly 12-pane timber sash and case windows. Grey slate roof; rooflights; stone skews; corniced gablehead stacks; circular cans.

INTERIOR: fireplaces to rooms include alabaster, timber and composition, and marble examples; pelmets and cornices (many with gold-leaf work). Moulded balusters and timber handrail to main stone staircase. 19th century timber sink and kitchen fittings to 17th century wing.

WALLED GARDEN: garden loggia, 1921 with brick pillars to outer left of SE elevation (see above); plaque within. Urns atop boundary wall enclosing garden. Iron gate to rear of garden leads to outer kitchen garden; attached ancillary structures (see SE elevation ) to NE, garage to S.

GATEPIERS, GATES AND BOUNDARY WALL: square-plan panelled stone gatepiers to central entrance; 2-leaf iron gates; 2-leaf timber gates to outer right of entrance elevation; iron gate to walled garden to SE elevation; timber gate to garden to S elevation; high rubble wall enclosing site (curved to entrance elevation); finely detailed pilastered and pedimented doorpiece to SW wall; timber door with crest above leads to garden at rear.

Statement of Special Interest

Outstanding detailing throughout, including the two adjacent doors to the elegant entrance porch, providing shelter whichever way the wind blows. Of particular note, are the interior features, especially the fine variety of fireplaces, cornices and pelmets. Some pelmets came from the 18th century town houses in Grosvenor Square, London, to make way for the United States Embassy (Findlay, p34).

References

Bibliography

John Wood's Plan of Ayr, 1818 (evident); James Paterson HISTORY OF THE COUNTY OF AYR, Vol 1 (1847), p179; William Dodd "Ayr: A Study of Urban Growth" in AYRSHIRE ARCHAEOLOGICAL AND NATURAL HISTORY COLLECTIONS, Vol 10 (1972), p338; Catriona Findlay "Barns House, Ayr" in SCOTTISH FIELD (February, 1976), pp32-34; Rob Close AYRSHIRE AND ARRAN (1992), p24; John Strawhorn and Ken Andrew DISCOVERING AYRSHIRE (1988), p105; Dane Love PICTORIAL HISTORY OF AYR (1995), p10; NMRS Photographic Archive (A5853).

About Designations

Listed Buildings

Listing is the way that a building or structure of special architectural or historic interest is recognised by law through the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings of special architectural or historic interest using the criteria published in the Historic Environment Scotland Policy Statement.

The statutory listing address is the legal part of the listing. The information in the listed building record gives an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building(s). It is not a definitive historical account or a complete description of the building(s). The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

Listing covers both the exterior and the interior. Listing can cover structures not mentioned which are part of the curtilage of the building, such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. The planning authority is responsible for advising on what is covered by the listing including the curtilage of a listed building. For information about curtilage see www.historicenvironment.scot. Since 1 October 2015 we have been able to exclude items from a listing. If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the Historic Environment Scotland Act 2014. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect current legislation.

If you want to alter, extend or demolish a listed building you need to contact your planning authority to see if you need listed building consent. The planning authority is the main point of contact for all applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot. You can contact us on 0131 668 8716 or at designations@hes.scot.

Images

There are no images available for this record.

Printed: 05/12/2016 02:28