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Listed Building

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site only. All other information in the record is not statutory.

49 AND 51 BELMONT STREET, THE BELMONT PICTUREHOUSE (FORMER TRADES COUNCIL HALL)LB20132

Status: Designated

Documents

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Summary

Information

  • Category: C
  • Date Added: 24/04/1987

Location

  • Local Authority: Aberdeen
  • Planning Authority: Aberdeen
  • Burgh: Aberdeen

National Grid Reference

  • NGR: NJ 93903 6263
  • Coordinates: 393903, 806263

Description

Alexander Ellis and Robert Gordon Wilson, dated 1896. Tall, substantial hall building designed to be viewed principally from Union Terrace and Roseburn Viaduct. Diminutive single bay grey granite ashlar entrance at 51 Belmont Street: pilastered and keystoned arch with scrolled segmental panel dated 1896 over parapet. Arch leads to 6-bay main hall: squared grey granite rubble with tooled dressings; 6 round-headed openings to upper hall N and S elevations. W ELEVATION: Venetian window at upper level; shouldered wallhead stack above flanked by corbelled, domed and finialed bartizans at western angles. Staggered staircase descends length of N elevation.

Predominantly blacked-out windows; grey slate, piended roof to main hall.

INTERIOR: Originally 2 principal storeys, the main hall is now converted to a cinema and divided horizontally at gallery level; retains some plasterwork.

Statement of Special Interest

Situated directly to the rear of 47 Belmont Street, the diminutive entrance at Belmont Street gives little hint of the large and impressive former Trades Hall to which it leads. Making full use of the different levels of the site, local architects Ellis and Wilson designed an impressive hall which adds significantly to the streetscape of Roseburn Viaduct. Tall and narrow with clasping bartizan towers, it is a distinctive piece of architecture.

Designed for the Trades Council, it was used principally for meetings of Aberdeen's newly established Labour Movement. The ceiling of the main hall originally had painted panels, possibly still in existence under later paint. Belmont Street was open pasture running alongside the Denburn until the 1770¿s from which point it was feued for building and quickly developed with a variety of uses and styles in evidence to this day.

References

Bibliography

Chapman and Riley, 'The City and Royal Burgh of Aberdeen ¿ Survey and Plan (1949) p.149; W A Brogden ¿ Aberdeen, An Illustrated Architectural Guide (1986) p.39. Ranald MacInnes, The Aberdeen Guide (1992) p98.

About Designations

Listed Buildings

Listing is the way that a building or structure of special architectural or historic interest is recognised by law through the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings of special architectural or historic interest using the criteria published in the Historic Environment Scotland Policy Statement.

The statutory listing address is the legal part of the listing. The information in the listed building record gives an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building(s). It is not a definitive historical account or a complete description of the building(s). The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

Listing covers both the exterior and the interior. Listing can cover structures not mentioned which are part of the curtilage of the building, such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. The planning authority is responsible for advising on what is covered by the listing including the curtilage of a listed building. For information about curtilage see www.historicenvironment.scot. Since 1 October 2015 we have been able to exclude items from a listing. If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the Historic Environment Scotland Act 2014. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect current legislation.

If you want to alter, extend or demolish a listed building you need to contact your planning authority to see if you need listed building consent. The planning authority is the main point of contact for all applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot. You can contact us on 0131 668 8716 or at designations@hes.scot.

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Printed: 20/10/2017 02:34