Listed Building

The only legal part of the listing is the address/name of site. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing – see ‘About Listed Buildings’ below for more information.

TORTHORWALD VILLAGE CRUCK COTTAGELB17157

Status: Designated

Documents

There are no additional online documents for this record.

Summary

Category
A
Date Added
03/08/1971
Supplementary Information Updated
07/03/2019
Local Authority
Dumfries And Galloway
Planning Authority
Dumfries And Galloway
Parish
Torthorwald
NGR
NY 3273 78480
Coordinates
303273, 578480

Description

Largely rebuilt probably in first half of 19th century. Single storey, three-bay thatch roofed cottage. Limewashed rubble. Damaged by fire in 1956, restored and re-thatched 1960. Further restoration work carried in 1991-93 and rethatched with rye straw and heather ridge in early 21st century

Central door in south elevation flanked by two deeply recessed windows (four-pane sashes). Single window with lying panes in each gable. Off-centre door in north wall. Chimney stack on west gable with thatch taken around chimney.

Interior: crucks and tie beams exposed, interior partitions removed.

Statement of Special Interest

In use as a museum (2019).

It is among a relatively small number of traditional buildings with a surviving thatched roof found across Scotland. A Survey of Thatched Buildings in Scotland, published in 2016 by the Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings (SPAB), found there were only around 200 buildings of this type remaining, most of which are found in small rural communities. Thatched buildings are often traditionally built, showing distinctive local and regional building methods and materials. Those that survive are important in helping us understand these traditional skills and an earlier way of life.

Listed building record revised in 2019 as part of the Thatched Buildings Listing Review 2017-19.

References

Bibliography

Canmore https://canmore.org.uk/ Canmore ID 74206.

Printed Sources

Dumfries and Galloway Standard (17 September 1960 and 12 November 1960)

Gifford, J. (1996) The Buildings of Scotland: Dumfries and Galloway. p.555.

Hume, J R. (2000) Dumfries and Galloway: an illustrated architectural guide. pp.35-366.

Stell, G. (1971-2) Two cruck-framed buildings in Dumfriesshire in Transactions of the Dumfriesshire Galloway Natural History and Antiquarian Society Volume 49. pp.39-48.

The Society for the Protection of Ancient Buildings Scotland (2016) A Survey of Thatched Buildings in Scotland. London: SPAB. pp.93-96.

Online Sources

Cruck Cottage Heritage Association at http://cruckcottage.com/ (accessed 07/03/2019).

Historic Environment Scotland (2018) Scotland's Thatched Buildings: Introductory Designations Report at https://www.historicenvironment.scot/archives-and-research/publications/publication/?publicationId=8b3d1317-5a56-4416-905b-a8e800bf4c3c

About Listed Buildings

Listing is the way that a building or structure of special architectural or historic interest is recognised by law through the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings of special architectural or historic interest using the criteria published in the Historic Environment Scotland Policy Statement.

The information in the listed building record gives an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building(s). It is not a definitive historical account or a complete description of the building(s). The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

The only legal part of the listing is the address/name of site. Addresses and building names may have changed since the date of listing and if a number or name is missing from a listing address it may still be listed. Listing covers both the exterior and the interior and any object or structure fixed to the building. Listing can also cover structures not physically attached but which are part of the curtilage of the building, such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. The planning authority is responsible for advising on what is covered by the listing including the curtilage of a listed building. Since 1 October 2015 we have been able to exclude items from a listing. If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the Historic Environment Scotland Act 2014. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect current legislation.

If you want to alter, extend or demolish a listed building you need to contact your planning authority to see if you need listed building consent. The planning authority advises on the need for listed building consent and they also decide what a listing covers. The planning authority is the main point of contact for all applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot/advice-and-support. You can contact us on 0131 668 8716 or at designations@hes.scot.

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Printed: 25/03/2019 22:01