Listed Building

The legal part of the listing is the address/name of site only. All other information in the record is not statutory.

MAAM HOUSE INCLUDING OUTBUILDINGLB11517

Status: Designated

Documents

There are no additional online documents for this record.

Summary

Category
B
Date Added
28/03/2011
Local Authority
Argyll And Bute
Planning Authority
Argyll And Bute
Parish
Inveraray
NGR
NN 12190 12858
Coordinates
212190, 712858

Description

Early 19th century. 2-storey and attic, 3-bay, classically proportioned farmhouse situated near to Inveraray Great Farm steading at Glen Shira. Slightly advanced bay to centre under cat-slide roof. Timber bracketed eaves. Rubble, predominantly harled and painted white. Flat-decked piend roof. Single storey swept roof porch to front and single-storey outshot with pitched roof to rear. Detached, single-storey gabled outbuilding at N corner angle.

Predominantly 12-pane glazing in timber sash and case windows. Grey slate. Tall end stacks. Cast iron rainwater goods.

INTERIOR: principal reception room to first floor. Stair with curving hardwood rail and thin metal banisters rising to hall at first floor; ornate cast iron banisters to further staircase rising to attic level. Reception room to E with deep moulded cornice and dado. Ground floor, largely remodelled: kitchen to W; sitting room to E with decorative plaster cornice, rectangular alcove and press. Timber fireplaces and timber shutters throughout.

OUTBUILDING: small detached retangular-plan, gabled outbuilding to N angle of house. Coped stack to W gable with clay cans. Grey slate. Later, corrugated sheet washhouse, garage and woodstore adjoining W gable.

Statement of Special Interest

Maam House is a major example of a classically proportioned Georgian farmhouse with advanced central bay, bracketed eaves and flat-deck piended roof occupying a fine rural setting adjacent to the Inveraray Great Farm steading (see separate listing) at Maam in Glen Shira.

The house was built for General Charles Turner who was Govenor of Sierra Leone until his death in 1826. The layout of rooms is distinctive with the main hall and principal rooms at first floor level with views to the steading and farmland beyond. The ground floor rooms were remodelled during the 1970s at which time the south facing windows were enlarged. The earlier openings were considerably smaller suggesting that the ground floor rooms originally served different purposes. The small detached rubble-built outbuilding to the N corner is contemporary with the building of the house. Evidence from the 1st Edition Ordnance Survey map (1862) suggests it was formerly linked to the house, possibly by way of a passage or further outbuilding.

The remarkable half-circle Gothick Steading at Maam (see separate listing) was designed by master mason to the Crown of Scotland, Robert Mylne. It was a centrepiece of the 5th Duke of Argyll's programme of late 18th century agricultural improvements in Inveraray. Standing 80m to the S of Maam farmhouse, the two buildings group together contextually, adding to the interest.

List description revised, 2012.

References

Bibliography

Maam House is a major example of a classically proportioned Georgian house with advanced central bay, bracketed eaves and flat-deck piended roof occupying a fine rural setting adjacent to the Inveraray Great Farm steading (see separate listing) at Maam in Glen Shira.

The house was built for General Charles Turner who was Govenor of Sierra Leone until his death in 1826. The layout of rooms is distinctive with the main hall and principal rooms at first floor level with views to the steading and farmland beyond. The ground floor rooms were remodelled during the 1970s at which time the south facing windows were enlarged. The earlier openings were considerably smaller suggesting that the ground floor rooms originally served different purposes, possibly connected to farm use. The small detached rubble-built outbuilding to the N corner is contemporary with the building of the house. Evidence from the 1st Edition Ordnance Survey map (1862) suggests it was formerly linked to the house, possibly by way of a passage or further outbuilding.

The remarkable half-circle Gothick Steading at Maam (see separate listing) was designed by master mason to the Crown of Scotland, Robert Mylne. It was a centrepiece of the 5th Duke of Argyll's programme of late 18th century agricultural improvements in Inveraray. Standing 80m to the S of Maam House, the two buildings group together contextually, adding to the interest.

Listed in 1980 as "Maam Farmhouse". Change of statutory address and list description revised, 2012.

About Listed Buildings

Listing is the way that a building or structure of special architectural or historic interest is recognised by law through the Planning (Listed Buildings and Conservation Areas) (Scotland) Act 1997.

We list buildings of special architectural or historic interest using the criteria published in the Historic Environment Scotland Policy Statement.

The statutory listing address is the legal part of the listing. The information in the listed building record gives an indication of the special architectural or historic interest of the listed building(s). It is not a definitive historical account or a complete description of the building(s). The format of the listed building record has changed over time. Earlier records may be brief and some information will not have been recorded.

Listing covers both the exterior and the interior. Listing can cover structures not mentioned which are part of the curtilage of the building, such as boundary walls, gates, gatepiers, ancillary buildings etc. The planning authority is responsible for advising on what is covered by the listing including the curtilage of a listed building. For information about curtilage see www.historicenvironment.scot. Since 1 October 2015 we have been able to exclude items from a listing. If part of a building is not listed, it will say that it is excluded in the statutory address and in the statement of special interest in the listed building record. The statement will use the word 'excluding' and quote the relevant section of the Historic Environment Scotland Act 2014. Some earlier listed building records may use the word 'excluding', but if the Act is not quoted, the record has not been revised to reflect current legislation.

If you want to alter, extend or demolish a listed building you need to contact your planning authority to see if you need listed building consent. The planning authority is the main point of contact for all applications for listed building consent.

Find out more about listing and our other designations at www.historicenvironment.scot. You can contact us on 0131 668 8716 or at designations@hes.scot.

Images

There are no images available for this record, you may want to check Canmore for images relating to MAAM HOUSE INCLUDING OUTBUILDING

There are no images available for this record.

Search Canmore

Printed: 18/11/2018 12:56